Janus kinases and their role in growth and disease

M. Aringer, Alan Cheng, J. W. Nelson, M. Chen, C. Sudarshan, Y. J. Zhou, J. J. O'Shea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Janus kinases (JAK) play a crucial role in the initial steps of cytokine signaling. Each of the four members (JAK1, JAK2, JAK3, TYK2) of this non- receptor tyrosine kinase family is indispensable for the effects of distinct cytokines. Moreover, recent reports have added to our knowledge on their highly specific functions: JAK3 knockout mice and JAK3 deficient patients cannot signal through the interleukin-2,4,7,9, or 15 receptors and suffer from severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). JAK1 and JAK2 knockout mice do not survive, their cells again showing distinct patterns of cytokine signaling deficits. At the other end of the spectrum, JAK fusion proteins have been shown to play a role in leukemias. In addition, a new class of JAK- specific inhibitors was described by several groups, the CIS/SOCS/Jab family. This review on the rapidly growing field focuses on JAK function and regulation, and on their emerging role in development and human disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2173-2186
Number of pages14
JournalLife Sciences
Volume64
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - May 7 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Janus Kinases
Cytokines
Growth
Knockout Mice
Severe Combined Immunodeficiency
Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Human Development
Interleukin-4
Interleukin-2
Leukemia
Fusion reactions
Proteins

Keywords

  • Cytokine receptors
  • Interferons
  • Interleukins
  • Janus kinases
  • Signal transduction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Aringer, M., Cheng, A., Nelson, J. W., Chen, M., Sudarshan, C., Zhou, Y. J., & O'Shea, J. J. (1999). Janus kinases and their role in growth and disease. Life Sciences, 64(24), 2173-2186. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0024-3205(98)00538-4

Janus kinases and their role in growth and disease. / Aringer, M.; Cheng, Alan; Nelson, J. W.; Chen, M.; Sudarshan, C.; Zhou, Y. J.; O'Shea, J. J.

In: Life Sciences, Vol. 64, No. 24, 07.05.1999, p. 2173-2186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Aringer, M, Cheng, A, Nelson, JW, Chen, M, Sudarshan, C, Zhou, YJ & O'Shea, JJ 1999, 'Janus kinases and their role in growth and disease', Life Sciences, vol. 64, no. 24, pp. 2173-2186. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0024-3205(98)00538-4
Aringer M, Cheng A, Nelson JW, Chen M, Sudarshan C, Zhou YJ et al. Janus kinases and their role in growth and disease. Life Sciences. 1999 May 7;64(24):2173-2186. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0024-3205(98)00538-4
Aringer, M. ; Cheng, Alan ; Nelson, J. W. ; Chen, M. ; Sudarshan, C. ; Zhou, Y. J. ; O'Shea, J. J. / Janus kinases and their role in growth and disease. In: Life Sciences. 1999 ; Vol. 64, No. 24. pp. 2173-2186.
@article{6b4f175044bd4cfdac19c30aa1b4ab4c,
title = "Janus kinases and their role in growth and disease",
abstract = "Janus kinases (JAK) play a crucial role in the initial steps of cytokine signaling. Each of the four members (JAK1, JAK2, JAK3, TYK2) of this non- receptor tyrosine kinase family is indispensable for the effects of distinct cytokines. Moreover, recent reports have added to our knowledge on their highly specific functions: JAK3 knockout mice and JAK3 deficient patients cannot signal through the interleukin-2,4,7,9, or 15 receptors and suffer from severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). JAK1 and JAK2 knockout mice do not survive, their cells again showing distinct patterns of cytokine signaling deficits. At the other end of the spectrum, JAK fusion proteins have been shown to play a role in leukemias. In addition, a new class of JAK- specific inhibitors was described by several groups, the CIS/SOCS/Jab family. This review on the rapidly growing field focuses on JAK function and regulation, and on their emerging role in development and human disease.",
keywords = "Cytokine receptors, Interferons, Interleukins, Janus kinases, Signal transduction",
author = "M. Aringer and Alan Cheng and Nelson, {J. W.} and M. Chen and C. Sudarshan and Zhou, {Y. J.} and O'Shea, {J. J.}",
year = "1999",
month = "5",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1016/S0024-3205(98)00538-4",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "64",
pages = "2173--2186",
journal = "Life Sciences",
issn = "0024-3205",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "24",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Janus kinases and their role in growth and disease

AU - Aringer, M.

AU - Cheng, Alan

AU - Nelson, J. W.

AU - Chen, M.

AU - Sudarshan, C.

AU - Zhou, Y. J.

AU - O'Shea, J. J.

PY - 1999/5/7

Y1 - 1999/5/7

N2 - Janus kinases (JAK) play a crucial role in the initial steps of cytokine signaling. Each of the four members (JAK1, JAK2, JAK3, TYK2) of this non- receptor tyrosine kinase family is indispensable for the effects of distinct cytokines. Moreover, recent reports have added to our knowledge on their highly specific functions: JAK3 knockout mice and JAK3 deficient patients cannot signal through the interleukin-2,4,7,9, or 15 receptors and suffer from severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). JAK1 and JAK2 knockout mice do not survive, their cells again showing distinct patterns of cytokine signaling deficits. At the other end of the spectrum, JAK fusion proteins have been shown to play a role in leukemias. In addition, a new class of JAK- specific inhibitors was described by several groups, the CIS/SOCS/Jab family. This review on the rapidly growing field focuses on JAK function and regulation, and on their emerging role in development and human disease.

AB - Janus kinases (JAK) play a crucial role in the initial steps of cytokine signaling. Each of the four members (JAK1, JAK2, JAK3, TYK2) of this non- receptor tyrosine kinase family is indispensable for the effects of distinct cytokines. Moreover, recent reports have added to our knowledge on their highly specific functions: JAK3 knockout mice and JAK3 deficient patients cannot signal through the interleukin-2,4,7,9, or 15 receptors and suffer from severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). JAK1 and JAK2 knockout mice do not survive, their cells again showing distinct patterns of cytokine signaling deficits. At the other end of the spectrum, JAK fusion proteins have been shown to play a role in leukemias. In addition, a new class of JAK- specific inhibitors was described by several groups, the CIS/SOCS/Jab family. This review on the rapidly growing field focuses on JAK function and regulation, and on their emerging role in development and human disease.

KW - Cytokine receptors

KW - Interferons

KW - Interleukins

KW - Janus kinases

KW - Signal transduction

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033532324&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033532324&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0024-3205(98)00538-4

DO - 10.1016/S0024-3205(98)00538-4

M3 - Article

VL - 64

SP - 2173

EP - 2186

JO - Life Sciences

JF - Life Sciences

SN - 0024-3205

IS - 24

ER -