'It was a freak accident': An analysis of the labelling of injury events in the US press

Katherine Smith, Deborah C. Girasek, Susan P. Baker, Jennifer A. Manganello, Stephen M. Bowman, Alicia Samuels, Andrea Gielen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives Given that the news media shape our understanding of health issues, a study was undertaken to examine the use by the US media of the expression 'freak accident' in relation to injury events. This analysis is intended to contribute to the ongoing consideration of lay conceptualisation of injuries as 'accidents'. Methods LexisNexis Academic was used to search three purposively selected US news sources (Associated Press, New York Times and Philadelphia Inquirer) for the expression 'freak accident' over 5 years (2005e9). Textual analysis included both structured and open coding. Coding included measures for who used the expression within the story, the nature of the injury event and the injured person(s) being reported upon, incorporation of prevention information within the story and finally a phenomenological consideration of the uses and meanings of the expression within the story context. Results The search yielded a dataset of 250 human injury stories incorporating the term 'freak accident'. Injuries sustained by professional athletes dominated coverage (61%). Fewer than 10% of stories provided a clear and explicit injury prevention message. Stories in which journalists employed the expression 'freak accident' were less likely to include prevention information than stories in which the expression was used by people quoted in the story. Conclusions Journalists who frame injury events as freak accidents may be an appropriate focus for advocacy efforts. Effective prevention messages should be developed and disseminated to accompany injury reporting in order to educate and protect the public.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)38-43
Number of pages6
JournalInjury Prevention
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2012

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Accidents
Wounds and Injuries
Athletes
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

'It was a freak accident' : An analysis of the labelling of injury events in the US press. / Smith, Katherine; Girasek, Deborah C.; Baker, Susan P.; Manganello, Jennifer A.; Bowman, Stephen M.; Samuels, Alicia; Gielen, Andrea.

In: Injury Prevention, Vol. 18, No. 1, 02.2012, p. 38-43.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, Katherine ; Girasek, Deborah C. ; Baker, Susan P. ; Manganello, Jennifer A. ; Bowman, Stephen M. ; Samuels, Alicia ; Gielen, Andrea. / 'It was a freak accident' : An analysis of the labelling of injury events in the US press. In: Injury Prevention. 2012 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 38-43.
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