Is There a Difference in All-Cause Mortality Between Non-Hispanic Black and Non-Hispanic White Men With the Same Level of Education? Analyses Using the 2000–2011 National Health Interview Surveys

Danielle R. Gilmore, Keith E. Whitfield, Roland J Thorpe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Although men have greater societal and economic privileges, men have higher all-cause mortality rates than women, even after controlling for education. Further, racial/ethnic mortality disparities exist among men with varying levels of education. Few studies have explored the independent effects of education and all-cause mortality between non-Hispanic Black and non-Hispanic White men with the same level of education. Our purpose was to identify trends in racial differences in all-cause mortality between non-Hispanic White and non-Hispanic Black men with the same level of education. Data for the study came from the National Health Interview Surveys 2000–2011 linked to the 2000–2009 Mortality Files. The Student’s t and chi-square tests were used to assess the mean and proportional differences between non-Hispanic White and non-Hispanic Black men (≥18 years of age) across a range of demographic and health-related factors. Cox proportional hazard models were specified to examine the association between level of education and all-cause mortality adjusting for the demographic and health characteristics. Except for men who did not complete high school, statistically significant differences in all-cause mortality are present between non-Hispanic Black and non-Hispanic White men with the same level of education. The findings reveal the importance of understanding the level of education on differences in all-cause mortality between non-Hispanic Whites and non-Hispanic Blacks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican journal of men's health
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Health Surveys
level of education
mortality
Interviews
Education
cause
Mortality
interview
health
Demography
Health
Chi-Square Distribution
Proportional Hazards Models
privilege
education
Economics
Students
trend
school
economics

Keywords

  • African American
  • all-cause mortality
  • Black
  • Caucasian
  • disparities
  • education
  • men
  • mortality
  • non-Hispanic
  • social determinant of health
  • White

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Is There a Difference in All-Cause Mortality Between Non-Hispanic Black and Non-Hispanic White Men With the Same Level of Education? Analyses Using the 2000–2011 National Health Interview Surveys",
abstract = "Although men have greater societal and economic privileges, men have higher all-cause mortality rates than women, even after controlling for education. Further, racial/ethnic mortality disparities exist among men with varying levels of education. Few studies have explored the independent effects of education and all-cause mortality between non-Hispanic Black and non-Hispanic White men with the same level of education. Our purpose was to identify trends in racial differences in all-cause mortality between non-Hispanic White and non-Hispanic Black men with the same level of education. Data for the study came from the National Health Interview Surveys 2000–2011 linked to the 2000–2009 Mortality Files. The Student’s t and chi-square tests were used to assess the mean and proportional differences between non-Hispanic White and non-Hispanic Black men (≥18 years of age) across a range of demographic and health-related factors. Cox proportional hazard models were specified to examine the association between level of education and all-cause mortality adjusting for the demographic and health characteristics. Except for men who did not complete high school, statistically significant differences in all-cause mortality are present between non-Hispanic Black and non-Hispanic White men with the same level of education. The findings reveal the importance of understanding the level of education on differences in all-cause mortality between non-Hispanic Whites and non-Hispanic Blacks.",
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