Is the mechanism of prefrontal hypofunction in depression the same as in schizophrenia? Regional cerebral blood flow during cognitive activation

K. F. Berman, A. R. Doran, D. Pickar, Daniel Weinberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

To test the hypothesis that depressed and schizophrenic patients have a common pathophysiological mechanism for hypofunction of the prefrontal cortex ('hypofrontality'), we measured regional cortical blood flow (rCBF) in ten depressed patients, ten patients with schizophrenia, and 20 age- and sex-matched normal controls. Blood flow was measured during three different cognitive conditions: a resting state, a simple number-matching sensorimotor control task, and the Wisconsin Card Sorting test (WCS). The schizophrenic patients had lower prefrontal rCBF during the WCS. There were no differences in global or regional flow between the depressed patients and the normal subjects during any testing condition. Analysis of rCBF lateralisation showed that during the WCS normal subjects had relatively more left parietal blood flow than depressed patients, who had more right parietal blood flow. Since the testing condition that has most consistently revealed hypofrontality in schizophrenia (i.e. the WCS) was not associated with abnormal rCBF in the depressed patients, these data suggest that the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying prefrontal hypofunction in depression and schizophrenia are different.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-192
Number of pages10
JournalBritish Journal of Psychiatry
Volume162
Issue numberFEB.
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

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Cerebrovascular Circulation
Regional Blood Flow
Schizophrenia
Depression
Prefrontal Cortex

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)

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Is the mechanism of prefrontal hypofunction in depression the same as in schizophrenia? Regional cerebral blood flow during cognitive activation. / Berman, K. F.; Doran, A. R.; Pickar, D.; Weinberger, Daniel.

In: British Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 162, No. FEB., 1993, p. 183-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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