Is Obesity Associated with Adverse Workers' Compensation Claims Outcomes?

Xu Guang Tao, Pu Yu Su, Larry Yuspeh, Robert A. Lavin, Nimisha Kalia, Edward J. Bernacki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: A pilot study indicated that obesity was associated with an increased time lost from work and higher costs among workers' compensation claimants sustaining severe, but not minor injuries. Objective: The aim of this study was to further test the hypotheses by increasing sample size and controlling for additional confounding factors. Method: Cost and lost time outcomes were assessed for 2301 lost time workers' compensation claims filed in 2011 and 2012 followed to the end of the first quarter of the third postinjury year. Result: Adjusting for gender, age, marital status, attorney involvement, and spinal procedures, the odds ratios of incurring a claim expense at least $100,000 after a severe injury for an overweight or obese versus normal weight claimant was 2.11 [95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.04 to 4.29] and 2.23 (95% CI:1.12-4.46), respectively. Conclusion: Obesity was associated with increased costs among workers' compensation claimants sustaining severe, but not minor injuries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)880-884
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume58
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 19 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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