Is ideal body image related to obesity and lifestyle behaviours in African American adolescents?

X. Chen, Youfa Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Childhood obesity epidemic has become a public health issue in the USA, especially among African American youths. Research on the association between ideal body image (IBI) and obesity and related lifestyle factors among African American children and adolescents is limited. Methods Data collected from 402 low-income African American adolescents aged 10-14 years in four Chicago public schools were used. Questionnaires were used to assess IBI, weight perception, weight control practices, and self-efficacy towards food and physical activity. Body mass index was calculated using measured weight and height. Associations between IBI and weight perception, overweight/obesity and lifestyle behaviours were assessed using linear and logistic regression models. Results The most frequently chosen ideal body size was the fourth of eight silhouettes (from thinnest to heaviest) for boys (55%) and girls (49%). Overweight and obese girls selected larger ideal body figures than the others (trend test: P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-228
Number of pages10
JournalChild: Care, Health and Development
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

Fingerprint

Body Image
Weight Perception
African Americans
Life Style
Ideal Body Weight
Obesity
Logistic Models
Weights and Measures
Pediatric Obesity
Body Size
Self Efficacy
Linear Models
Body Mass Index
Public Health
Exercise
Food
Research

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • African American
  • Ideal body image
  • Obesity
  • Weight control
  • Weight perception

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Is ideal body image related to obesity and lifestyle behaviours in African American adolescents? / Chen, X.; Wang, Youfa.

In: Child: Care, Health and Development, Vol. 38, No. 2, 03.2012, p. 219-228.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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