Is doctor-patient race concordance associated with greater satisfaction with care?

Thomas A. Laveist, Amani Nuru-Jeter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We examined a national sample of African American, white, Hispanic, and Asian American respondents to test the hypothesis that doctor-patient race concordance is predictive of patient satisfaction. Our analysis examined racial/ethnic differences in patient satisfaction among patients in multiple combinations of doctor-patient race/ethnicity pairs. Additionally, we outline the determinants of doctor-patient race concordance. The analysis used the 1994 Commonwealth Fund Minority Health Survey to construct a series of multivariate models. We found that for respondents in each race/ethnic group, patients who had a choice in the selection of their physician were more likely to be race concordant. Whites were more likely to be race concordant with their physician compared to African American, Hispanic, and Asian American respondents. Among each race/ethnic group, respondents who were race concordant reported greater satisfaction with their physician compared with respondents who were not race concordant. These findings suggest support for the continuation of efforts to increase the number of minority physicians, while placing greater emphasis on improving the ability of physicians to interact with patients who are not of their own race.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)296-306
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Health and Social Behavior
Volume43
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 2002

Fingerprint

Physicians
Asian Americans
Patient Satisfaction
Hispanic Americans
Ethnic Groups
African Americans
Minority Health
Aptitude
Health Surveys
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Is doctor-patient race concordance associated with greater satisfaction with care? / Laveist, Thomas A.; Nuru-Jeter, Amani.

In: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Vol. 43, No. 3, 09.2002, p. 296-306.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Laveist, Thomas A. ; Nuru-Jeter, Amani. / Is doctor-patient race concordance associated with greater satisfaction with care?. In: Journal of Health and Social Behavior. 2002 ; Vol. 43, No. 3. pp. 296-306.
@article{088b4d0329e9442c981e348b447669e1,
title = "Is doctor-patient race concordance associated with greater satisfaction with care?",
abstract = "We examined a national sample of African American, white, Hispanic, and Asian American respondents to test the hypothesis that doctor-patient race concordance is predictive of patient satisfaction. Our analysis examined racial/ethnic differences in patient satisfaction among patients in multiple combinations of doctor-patient race/ethnicity pairs. Additionally, we outline the determinants of doctor-patient race concordance. The analysis used the 1994 Commonwealth Fund Minority Health Survey to construct a series of multivariate models. We found that for respondents in each race/ethnic group, patients who had a choice in the selection of their physician were more likely to be race concordant. Whites were more likely to be race concordant with their physician compared to African American, Hispanic, and Asian American respondents. Among each race/ethnic group, respondents who were race concordant reported greater satisfaction with their physician compared with respondents who were not race concordant. These findings suggest support for the continuation of efforts to increase the number of minority physicians, while placing greater emphasis on improving the ability of physicians to interact with patients who are not of their own race.",
author = "Laveist, {Thomas A.} and Amani Nuru-Jeter",
year = "2002",
month = "9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "43",
pages = "296--306",
journal = "Journal of Health and Social Behavior",
issn = "0022-1465",
publisher = "American Sociological Association",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is doctor-patient race concordance associated with greater satisfaction with care?

AU - Laveist, Thomas A.

AU - Nuru-Jeter, Amani

PY - 2002/9

Y1 - 2002/9

N2 - We examined a national sample of African American, white, Hispanic, and Asian American respondents to test the hypothesis that doctor-patient race concordance is predictive of patient satisfaction. Our analysis examined racial/ethnic differences in patient satisfaction among patients in multiple combinations of doctor-patient race/ethnicity pairs. Additionally, we outline the determinants of doctor-patient race concordance. The analysis used the 1994 Commonwealth Fund Minority Health Survey to construct a series of multivariate models. We found that for respondents in each race/ethnic group, patients who had a choice in the selection of their physician were more likely to be race concordant. Whites were more likely to be race concordant with their physician compared to African American, Hispanic, and Asian American respondents. Among each race/ethnic group, respondents who were race concordant reported greater satisfaction with their physician compared with respondents who were not race concordant. These findings suggest support for the continuation of efforts to increase the number of minority physicians, while placing greater emphasis on improving the ability of physicians to interact with patients who are not of their own race.

AB - We examined a national sample of African American, white, Hispanic, and Asian American respondents to test the hypothesis that doctor-patient race concordance is predictive of patient satisfaction. Our analysis examined racial/ethnic differences in patient satisfaction among patients in multiple combinations of doctor-patient race/ethnicity pairs. Additionally, we outline the determinants of doctor-patient race concordance. The analysis used the 1994 Commonwealth Fund Minority Health Survey to construct a series of multivariate models. We found that for respondents in each race/ethnic group, patients who had a choice in the selection of their physician were more likely to be race concordant. Whites were more likely to be race concordant with their physician compared to African American, Hispanic, and Asian American respondents. Among each race/ethnic group, respondents who were race concordant reported greater satisfaction with their physician compared with respondents who were not race concordant. These findings suggest support for the continuation of efforts to increase the number of minority physicians, while placing greater emphasis on improving the ability of physicians to interact with patients who are not of their own race.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0036717375&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0036717375&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 12467254

AN - SCOPUS:0036717375

VL - 43

SP - 296

EP - 306

JO - Journal of Health and Social Behavior

JF - Journal of Health and Social Behavior

SN - 0022-1465

IS - 3

ER -