Is depression associated with contraceptive motivations, intentions, and use among a sample of low-income latinas?

Diana N. Carvajal, Sharon R. Ghazarian, Sarah Shea Crowne, Pamela Bohrer Brown, Olivia Carter Pokras, Anne K Duggan, Beth Barnet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Latinas in the United States experience high rates of unintended pregnancy and low rates of contraception use, yet reasons are not completely understood. Depression is common among pregnant and nonpregnant Latinas; its influence on contraceptive motivations, intentions, and use is understudied. Objectives: We sought to 1) describe Latinas' contraceptive motivations, intentions, and use; 2) use structural equation modeling to test associations between depression and contraceptive self-efficacy/motivations/intentions/use; and 3)determine whether associations differ by pregnancy status. Methods: This cross-sectional study included Latinas ages 15 to 45 recruited from an urban Federally Qualified Health Center in Baltimore, Maryland. Structured surveys were used to collect data regarding depressive symptoms measured using the PHQ-9. All other constructs were measured with previously validated questions. Constructs included contraceptive self-efficacy, positive and negative contraceptive motivations (perceived advantages and disadvantages of using contraception), contraceptive intentions to begin or continue contraception use, and contraceptive methods currently used. Results: Among pregnant Latinas, depression was associated with negative motivations (β=0.16; p

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalWomen's Health Issues
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

Fingerprint

Contraceptive Agents
Hispanic Americans
contraceptive
Motivation
low income
Depression
Contraception
contraception
Self Efficacy
self-efficacy
pregnancy
Baltimore
Pregnancy Rate
cross-sectional study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Pregnancy
Health
health
experience

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Maternity and Midwifery
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Is depression associated with contraceptive motivations, intentions, and use among a sample of low-income latinas? / Carvajal, Diana N.; Ghazarian, Sharon R.; Crowne, Sarah Shea; Brown, Pamela Bohrer; Pokras, Olivia Carter; Duggan, Anne K; Barnet, Beth.

In: Women's Health Issues, Vol. 24, No. 1, 01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carvajal, Diana N. ; Ghazarian, Sharon R. ; Crowne, Sarah Shea ; Brown, Pamela Bohrer ; Pokras, Olivia Carter ; Duggan, Anne K ; Barnet, Beth. / Is depression associated with contraceptive motivations, intentions, and use among a sample of low-income latinas?. In: Women's Health Issues. 2014 ; Vol. 24, No. 1.
@article{8593cbda31dd46f38c4e897179fff99d,
title = "Is depression associated with contraceptive motivations, intentions, and use among a sample of low-income latinas?",
abstract = "Background: Latinas in the United States experience high rates of unintended pregnancy and low rates of contraception use, yet reasons are not completely understood. Depression is common among pregnant and nonpregnant Latinas; its influence on contraceptive motivations, intentions, and use is understudied. Objectives: We sought to 1) describe Latinas' contraceptive motivations, intentions, and use; 2) use structural equation modeling to test associations between depression and contraceptive self-efficacy/motivations/intentions/use; and 3)determine whether associations differ by pregnancy status. Methods: This cross-sectional study included Latinas ages 15 to 45 recruited from an urban Federally Qualified Health Center in Baltimore, Maryland. Structured surveys were used to collect data regarding depressive symptoms measured using the PHQ-9. All other constructs were measured with previously validated questions. Constructs included contraceptive self-efficacy, positive and negative contraceptive motivations (perceived advantages and disadvantages of using contraception), contraceptive intentions to begin or continue contraception use, and contraceptive methods currently used. Results: Among pregnant Latinas, depression was associated with negative motivations (β=0.16; p",
author = "Carvajal, {Diana N.} and Ghazarian, {Sharon R.} and Crowne, {Sarah Shea} and Brown, {Pamela Bohrer} and Pokras, {Olivia Carter} and Duggan, {Anne K} and Beth Barnet",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.whi.2013.10.003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "24",
journal = "Women's Health Issues",
issn = "1049-3867",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is depression associated with contraceptive motivations, intentions, and use among a sample of low-income latinas?

AU - Carvajal, Diana N.

AU - Ghazarian, Sharon R.

AU - Crowne, Sarah Shea

AU - Brown, Pamela Bohrer

AU - Pokras, Olivia Carter

AU - Duggan, Anne K

AU - Barnet, Beth

PY - 2014/1

Y1 - 2014/1

N2 - Background: Latinas in the United States experience high rates of unintended pregnancy and low rates of contraception use, yet reasons are not completely understood. Depression is common among pregnant and nonpregnant Latinas; its influence on contraceptive motivations, intentions, and use is understudied. Objectives: We sought to 1) describe Latinas' contraceptive motivations, intentions, and use; 2) use structural equation modeling to test associations between depression and contraceptive self-efficacy/motivations/intentions/use; and 3)determine whether associations differ by pregnancy status. Methods: This cross-sectional study included Latinas ages 15 to 45 recruited from an urban Federally Qualified Health Center in Baltimore, Maryland. Structured surveys were used to collect data regarding depressive symptoms measured using the PHQ-9. All other constructs were measured with previously validated questions. Constructs included contraceptive self-efficacy, positive and negative contraceptive motivations (perceived advantages and disadvantages of using contraception), contraceptive intentions to begin or continue contraception use, and contraceptive methods currently used. Results: Among pregnant Latinas, depression was associated with negative motivations (β=0.16; p

AB - Background: Latinas in the United States experience high rates of unintended pregnancy and low rates of contraception use, yet reasons are not completely understood. Depression is common among pregnant and nonpregnant Latinas; its influence on contraceptive motivations, intentions, and use is understudied. Objectives: We sought to 1) describe Latinas' contraceptive motivations, intentions, and use; 2) use structural equation modeling to test associations between depression and contraceptive self-efficacy/motivations/intentions/use; and 3)determine whether associations differ by pregnancy status. Methods: This cross-sectional study included Latinas ages 15 to 45 recruited from an urban Federally Qualified Health Center in Baltimore, Maryland. Structured surveys were used to collect data regarding depressive symptoms measured using the PHQ-9. All other constructs were measured with previously validated questions. Constructs included contraceptive self-efficacy, positive and negative contraceptive motivations (perceived advantages and disadvantages of using contraception), contraceptive intentions to begin or continue contraception use, and contraceptive methods currently used. Results: Among pregnant Latinas, depression was associated with negative motivations (β=0.16; p

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84892458701&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84892458701&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.whi.2013.10.003

DO - 10.1016/j.whi.2013.10.003

M3 - Article

C2 - 24439935

AN - SCOPUS:84892458701

VL - 24

JO - Women's Health Issues

JF - Women's Health Issues

SN - 1049-3867

IS - 1

ER -