Is cholesterol a culprit in Alzheimer's disease?

D. Larry Sparks, Marwan N. Sabbagh, John C.S. Breitner, John C. Hunsaker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A pivotal role for cholesterol influence on production of the putative AD toxin, amyloid β (Aβ), has been amply demonstrated. More importantly, this relationship has consistently been identified in both in vivo and in vitro studies. Lowering cholesterol levels has been shown to cause a beneficial effect on Aβ levels in animal models, and epidemiological data indicate a beneficial effect on the risk of AD with prior statin use. Blinded, placebo-controlled clinical investigations assessing the benefit of statins on cognitive indices in mild to moderate AD are ongoing and one will be reported on soon. A prospective study assessing the effect of statin use on the risk of AD is under way as an observational component of a placebo-controlled primary prevention trial testing anti-inflammatory agents. Nevertheless, the foregoing suggests that routine monitoring and intervention for elevated cholesterol levels among the elderly could promote more than a healthy heart.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)153-159
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Psychogeriatrics
Volume15
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003

Fingerprint

Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Alzheimer Disease
Cholesterol
Placebos
Primary Prevention
Hypercholesterolemia
Amyloid
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Animal Models
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • AD prevention
  • AD treatment
  • Clinical trials
  • Statins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Aging
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Is cholesterol a culprit in Alzheimer's disease? / Sparks, D. Larry; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Breitner, John C.S.; Hunsaker, John C.

In: International Psychogeriatrics, Vol. 15, No. SUPPL. 1, 2003, p. 153-159.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sparks, D. Larry ; Sabbagh, Marwan N. ; Breitner, John C.S. ; Hunsaker, John C. / Is cholesterol a culprit in Alzheimer's disease?. In: International Psychogeriatrics. 2003 ; Vol. 15, No. SUPPL. 1. pp. 153-159.
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