Is breast not best? Feeding babies born to HIV-positive mothers: Bringing balance to a complex issue

Jean Hawes Humphrey, Peter Iliff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Breastfeeding prevents millions of infant deaths each year throughout the world but causes at least one-third of all pediatric HIV infections. The first randomized trial of breastfeeding versus formula feeding, reported from Nairobi in March 2000, demonstrated an improved outcome for babies of highly selected HIV-positive mothers assigned to formula feed. However, several conditions must be in place and accepted before such replacement feeding can increase HIV-free survival. The proportion of sub-Saharan African women who have access to and will accept these conditions is small. In the short term, efforts to make breastfeeding safer will probably benefit a greater number of African babies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)119-127
Number of pages9
JournalNutrition Reviews
Volume59
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 2001

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breast feeding
infants
Breast Feeding
breasts
Breast
Mothers
HIV
bottle feeding
feed formulation
HIV infections
HIV Infections
Pediatrics
death
Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Is breast not best? Feeding babies born to HIV-positive mothers : Bringing balance to a complex issue. / Humphrey, Jean Hawes; Iliff, Peter.

In: Nutrition Reviews, Vol. 59, No. 4, 04.2001, p. 119-127.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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