Is a double-blind clinical trial really double-blind? - A report of doctors' medication guesses

Karl Rickels, Ronald S. Lipman, Seymour Fisher, Lee C. Park, Eberhard H. Uhlenhuth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In a double-blind trial of meprobamate and placebo, carried out with 138 anxious neurotic outpatients, psychiatrists performed medication guesses after 2, 4, and 6 weeks of therapy. At the same time, physician and patient independently completed several improvement measures and the physician recorded the presence or absence of side reactions as spontaneously reported by the patient. The results may be summarized as follows: a) Clinical improvement and side effects often enable the physician to make reliable medication guesses and thus break the double-blind design in drug trials. b) Clinical improvement seems to exert the most important influence in determining physician medication guesses, at least with anti-anxiety drugs in studies of only 4 to 6 weeks duration. c) The correlation between side effects and medication guesses increases with the duration of therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)329-336
Number of pages8
JournalPsychopharmacology
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1970

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Clinical Trials
Physicians
Meprobamate
Drug Design
Anti-Anxiety Agents
Psychiatry
Outpatients
Placebos
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Anxiety Neurosis
  • Clinical Improvement
  • Medication Guess
  • Meprobamate
  • Side Effects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Is a double-blind clinical trial really double-blind? - A report of doctors' medication guesses. / Rickels, Karl; Lipman, Ronald S.; Fisher, Seymour; Park, Lee C.; Uhlenhuth, Eberhard H.

In: Psychopharmacology, Vol. 16, No. 4, 01.1970, p. 329-336.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rickels, Karl ; Lipman, Ronald S. ; Fisher, Seymour ; Park, Lee C. ; Uhlenhuth, Eberhard H. / Is a double-blind clinical trial really double-blind? - A report of doctors' medication guesses. In: Psychopharmacology. 1970 ; Vol. 16, No. 4. pp. 329-336.
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