Irradiation of glomus jugulare tumors

a historical perspective.

Gordon Li, Steven Chang, John R. Adler, Michael Lim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Glomus jugulare tumors are rare, slow-growing vascular lesions that arise from the chief cells of the paraganglia within the jugular bulb. They can be associated with the tympanic branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve (Jacobsen nerve) or the auricular branch of the vagus nerve (Arnold nerve) and are also referred to as chemodectomas or nonchromaffin paragangliomas. Optimal treatment of these histologically benign tumors remains controversial. Surgery remains the treatment of choice, but can carry high morbidity rates. External-beam radiation was originally used for subtotal resections and in patients who were poor surgical candidates; however, radiosurgery has recently been introduced as an effective and safe treatment option for patients with these tumors. In this article the authors discuss the history of radiation therapy for glomus jugulare tumors, focusing on recent radiosurgical results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNeurosurgical Focus
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Glomus Jugulare Tumor
Extra-Adrenal Paraganglioma
Glossopharyngeal Nerve
Vagus Nerve
Radiosurgery
Blood Vessels
Neoplasms
Neck
Radiotherapy
Therapeutics
History
Radiation
Morbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Irradiation of glomus jugulare tumors : a historical perspective. / Li, Gordon; Chang, Steven; Adler, John R.; Lim, Michael.

In: Neurosurgical Focus, Vol. 23, No. 6, 2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Li, Gordon ; Chang, Steven ; Adler, John R. ; Lim, Michael. / Irradiation of glomus jugulare tumors : a historical perspective. In: Neurosurgical Focus. 2007 ; Vol. 23, No. 6.
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