Iron mediates N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor-dependent stimulation of calcium-induced pathways and hippocampal synaptic plasticity

Pablo Muñoz, Alexis Humeres, Claudio Elgueta, Alfredo Kirkwood, Cecilia Hidalgo, Marco T. Núñez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Iron deficiency hinders hippocampus-dependent learning processes and impairs cognitive performance, but current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms underlying the unique role of iron in neuronal function is sparse. Here, we investigated the participation of iron on calcium signal generation and ERK1/2 stimulation induced by the glutamate agonist Nmethyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), and the effects of iron addition/chelation on hippocampal basal synaptic transmission and longterm potentiation (LTP). Addition of NMDA to primary hippocampal cultures elicited persistent calcium signals that required functional NMDA receptors and were independent of calcium influx through L-type calcium channels or α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors; NMDA also promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Iron chelation with desferrioxamine or inhibition of ryanodine receptor (RyR)-mediated calcium release with ryanodinereduced calcium signal duration and prevented NMDA-induced ERK1/2 activation. Iron addition to hippocampal neurons readily increased the intracellular labile iron pool and stimulated reactive oxygen species production; the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine or the hydroxyl radical trapper MCI-186 prevented these responses. Iron addition to primary hippocampal cultures kept in calcium-free medium elicited calcium signals and stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation; RyR inhibition abolished these effects. Iron chelation decreased basal synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices, inhibited iron-induced synaptic stimulation, and impaired sustained LTP in hippocampal CA1 neurons induced by strong stimulation. In contrast, iron addition facilitated sustained LTP induction after suboptimal tetanic stimulation. Together, these results suggest that hippocampal neurons require iron to generate RyR-mediated calcium signals after NMDA receptor stimulation, which in turn promotes ERK1/2 activation, an essential step of sustained LTP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13382-13392
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume286
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2011

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Neuronal Plasticity
N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors
Plasticity
Iron
Calcium
D-Aspartic Acid
Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel
Chelation
Neurons
Phosphorylation
Synaptic Transmission
Chemical activation
Excitatory Amino Acid Agonists
L-Type Calcium Channels
Deferoxamine
Acetylcysteine
Hydroxyl Radical
Reactive Oxygen Species
Hippocampus
Antioxidants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

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Iron mediates N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor-dependent stimulation of calcium-induced pathways and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. / Muñoz, Pablo; Humeres, Alexis; Elgueta, Claudio; Kirkwood, Alfredo; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Núñez, Marco T.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 286, No. 15, 15.04.2011, p. 13382-13392.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Muñoz, Pablo ; Humeres, Alexis ; Elgueta, Claudio ; Kirkwood, Alfredo ; Hidalgo, Cecilia ; Núñez, Marco T. / Iron mediates N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor-dependent stimulation of calcium-induced pathways and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. In: Journal of Biological Chemistry. 2011 ; Vol. 286, No. 15. pp. 13382-13392.
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