Involvement of platelets in tumour angiogenesis?

H. M. Pinedo, H. M W Verheul, R. J. D'Amato, J. Folkman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Preclinical and clinical research show that tumour growth is dependent on angiogenesis. Activation of the coagulation cascade is commonly found in patients with cancer. We propose that platelets contribute to tumour-induced angiogenesis. The basis of our hypothesis is that platelets are a rich source of stimulators and inhibitors of angiogenesis and their interaction with the endothelium. Presumably, the antithrombotic state of normal endothelium is disturbed by endothelial stimuli derived from tumour cells. This hypothesis may explain the suggested clinical benefits of anticoagulants in cancer and implies that targeting of platelet interaction with tumour vasculature will inhibit angiogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1775-1777
Number of pages3
JournalThe Lancet
Volume352
Issue number9142
StatePublished - Nov 28 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Blood Platelets
Neoplasms
Endothelium
Angiogenesis Inhibitors
Angiogenesis Inducing Agents
Anticoagulants
Growth
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Pinedo, H. M., Verheul, H. M. W., D'Amato, R. J., & Folkman, J. (1998). Involvement of platelets in tumour angiogenesis? The Lancet, 352(9142), 1775-1777.

Involvement of platelets in tumour angiogenesis? / Pinedo, H. M.; Verheul, H. M W; D'Amato, R. J.; Folkman, J.

In: The Lancet, Vol. 352, No. 9142, 28.11.1998, p. 1775-1777.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pinedo, HM, Verheul, HMW, D'Amato, RJ & Folkman, J 1998, 'Involvement of platelets in tumour angiogenesis?', The Lancet, vol. 352, no. 9142, pp. 1775-1777.
Pinedo HM, Verheul HMW, D'Amato RJ, Folkman J. Involvement of platelets in tumour angiogenesis? The Lancet. 1998 Nov 28;352(9142):1775-1777.
Pinedo, H. M. ; Verheul, H. M W ; D'Amato, R. J. ; Folkman, J. / Involvement of platelets in tumour angiogenesis?. In: The Lancet. 1998 ; Vol. 352, No. 9142. pp. 1775-1777.
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