Investigation of nerve injury through microfluidic devices

Rezina Siddique, Nitish V Thakor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Traumatic injuries, both in the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS), can potentially lead to irreversible damage resulting in permanent loss of function. Investigating the complex dynamics involved in these processes may elucidate the biological mechanisms of both nerve degeneration and regeneration, and may potentially lead to the development of new therapies for recovery. A scientific overview on the biological foundations of nerve injury is presented. Differences between nerve regeneration in the central and PNS are discussed. Advances in microtechnology over the past several years have led to the development of invaluable tools that now facilitate investigation of neurobiology at the cellular scale. Microfluidic devices are explored as a means to study nerve injury at the necessary simplification of the cellular level, including those devices aimed at both chemical and physical injury, as well as those that recreate the post-injury environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number20130676
JournalJournal of the Royal Society Interface
Volume11
Issue number90
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 6 2014

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Lab-On-A-Chip Devices
Neurology
Microfluidics
Wounds and Injuries
Nerve Regeneration
Peripheral Nervous System
Central Nervous System
Microtechnology
Nerve Degeneration
Neurobiology
Recovery
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Microfluidic chamber
  • Nerve regeneration
  • Peripheral nerve injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Biotechnology
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Biochemistry
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Investigation of nerve injury through microfluidic devices. / Siddique, Rezina; Thakor, Nitish V.

In: Journal of the Royal Society Interface, Vol. 11, No. 90, 20130676, 06.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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