Introducing Vi polysaccharide typhoid fever vaccine to primary school children in North Jakarta, Indonesia, via an existent school-based vaccination platform

M. D. Agtini, R. L. Ochiai, R. Soeharno, H. J. Lee, J. Sundoro, S. R. Hadinegoro, O. P. Han, L. Tana, F. X S Halim, L. Ghani, Delima, W. Lestari, F. X. Sintawati, N. Kusumawardani, R. Malik, T. S. Santoso, M. Nadjib, S. Soeroso, F. Wangsasaputra, Mohammad AliB. Ivanoff, C. M. Galindo, T. Pang, J. D. Clemens, A. Suwandono, C. J. Acosta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: To report results on coverage, safety and logistics of a large-scale, school-based Vi polysaccharide immunization campaign in North Jakarta. Methods: Of 443 primary schools in North Jakarta, Indonesia, 18 public schools were randomly selected for this study. Exclusion criteria were fever 37.5°C or higher at the time of vaccination or a known history of hypersensitivity to any vaccine. Adverse events were monitored and recorded for 1 month after immunization. Because this was a pilot programme, resource use was tracked in detail. Results: During the February 2004 vaccination campaign, 4828 students were immunized (91% of the target population); another 394 students (7%) were vaccinated during mop-up programmes. Informed consent was obtained for 98% of the target population. In all, 34 adverse events were reported, corresponding to seven events per 1000 doses injected; none was serious. The manufacturer recommended cold chain was maintained throughout the programme. Conclusions: This demonstration project in two sub-districts of North Jakarta shows that a large-scale, school-based typhoid fever Vi polysaccharide vaccination campaign is logistically feasible, safe and minimally disruptive to regular school activities, when used in the context of an existing successful immunization platform. The project had high parental acceptance. Nonetheless, policy-relevant questions still need to be answered before implementing a widespread Vi polysaccharide vaccine programme in Indonesia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1081-1087
Number of pages7
JournalPublic Health
Volume120
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2006

Fingerprint

Indonesia
Typhoid Fever
vaccination
schoolchild
primary school
Vaccination
campaign
Polysaccharides
Immunization
Immunization Programs
school
Health Services Needs and Demand
event
regular school
Vaccines
Students
Refrigeration
Informed Consent
exclusion
student

Keywords

  • Indonesia
  • Mass vaccination
  • Typhoid fever
  • Typhoid vi vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Introducing Vi polysaccharide typhoid fever vaccine to primary school children in North Jakarta, Indonesia, via an existent school-based vaccination platform. / Agtini, M. D.; Ochiai, R. L.; Soeharno, R.; Lee, H. J.; Sundoro, J.; Hadinegoro, S. R.; Han, O. P.; Tana, L.; Halim, F. X S; Ghani, L.; Delima; Lestari, W.; Sintawati, F. X.; Kusumawardani, N.; Malik, R.; Santoso, T. S.; Nadjib, M.; Soeroso, S.; Wangsasaputra, F.; Ali, Mohammad; Ivanoff, B.; Galindo, C. M.; Pang, T.; Clemens, J. D.; Suwandono, A.; Acosta, C. J.

In: Public Health, Vol. 120, No. 11, 11.2006, p. 1081-1087.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Agtini, MD, Ochiai, RL, Soeharno, R, Lee, HJ, Sundoro, J, Hadinegoro, SR, Han, OP, Tana, L, Halim, FXS, Ghani, L, Delima, Lestari, W, Sintawati, FX, Kusumawardani, N, Malik, R, Santoso, TS, Nadjib, M, Soeroso, S, Wangsasaputra, F, Ali, M, Ivanoff, B, Galindo, CM, Pang, T, Clemens, JD, Suwandono, A & Acosta, CJ 2006, 'Introducing Vi polysaccharide typhoid fever vaccine to primary school children in North Jakarta, Indonesia, via an existent school-based vaccination platform', Public Health, vol. 120, no. 11, pp. 1081-1087. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.puhe.2006.06.008
Agtini, M. D. ; Ochiai, R. L. ; Soeharno, R. ; Lee, H. J. ; Sundoro, J. ; Hadinegoro, S. R. ; Han, O. P. ; Tana, L. ; Halim, F. X S ; Ghani, L. ; Delima ; Lestari, W. ; Sintawati, F. X. ; Kusumawardani, N. ; Malik, R. ; Santoso, T. S. ; Nadjib, M. ; Soeroso, S. ; Wangsasaputra, F. ; Ali, Mohammad ; Ivanoff, B. ; Galindo, C. M. ; Pang, T. ; Clemens, J. D. ; Suwandono, A. ; Acosta, C. J. / Introducing Vi polysaccharide typhoid fever vaccine to primary school children in North Jakarta, Indonesia, via an existent school-based vaccination platform. In: Public Health. 2006 ; Vol. 120, No. 11. pp. 1081-1087.
@article{aa0612695ca143a78469a537bfd2e4cf,
title = "Introducing Vi polysaccharide typhoid fever vaccine to primary school children in North Jakarta, Indonesia, via an existent school-based vaccination platform",
abstract = "Objectives: To report results on coverage, safety and logistics of a large-scale, school-based Vi polysaccharide immunization campaign in North Jakarta. Methods: Of 443 primary schools in North Jakarta, Indonesia, 18 public schools were randomly selected for this study. Exclusion criteria were fever 37.5°C or higher at the time of vaccination or a known history of hypersensitivity to any vaccine. Adverse events were monitored and recorded for 1 month after immunization. Because this was a pilot programme, resource use was tracked in detail. Results: During the February 2004 vaccination campaign, 4828 students were immunized (91{\%} of the target population); another 394 students (7{\%}) were vaccinated during mop-up programmes. Informed consent was obtained for 98{\%} of the target population. In all, 34 adverse events were reported, corresponding to seven events per 1000 doses injected; none was serious. The manufacturer recommended cold chain was maintained throughout the programme. Conclusions: This demonstration project in two sub-districts of North Jakarta shows that a large-scale, school-based typhoid fever Vi polysaccharide vaccination campaign is logistically feasible, safe and minimally disruptive to regular school activities, when used in the context of an existing successful immunization platform. The project had high parental acceptance. Nonetheless, policy-relevant questions still need to be answered before implementing a widespread Vi polysaccharide vaccine programme in Indonesia.",
keywords = "Indonesia, Mass vaccination, Typhoid fever, Typhoid vi vaccine",
author = "Agtini, {M. D.} and Ochiai, {R. L.} and R. Soeharno and Lee, {H. J.} and J. Sundoro and Hadinegoro, {S. R.} and Han, {O. P.} and L. Tana and Halim, {F. X S} and L. Ghani and Delima and W. Lestari and Sintawati, {F. X.} and N. Kusumawardani and R. Malik and Santoso, {T. S.} and M. Nadjib and S. Soeroso and F. Wangsasaputra and Mohammad Ali and B. Ivanoff and Galindo, {C. M.} and T. Pang and Clemens, {J. D.} and A. Suwandono and Acosta, {C. J.}",
year = "2006",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1016/j.puhe.2006.06.008",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "120",
pages = "1081--1087",
journal = "Public Health",
issn = "0033-3506",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Introducing Vi polysaccharide typhoid fever vaccine to primary school children in North Jakarta, Indonesia, via an existent school-based vaccination platform

AU - Agtini, M. D.

AU - Ochiai, R. L.

AU - Soeharno, R.

AU - Lee, H. J.

AU - Sundoro, J.

AU - Hadinegoro, S. R.

AU - Han, O. P.

AU - Tana, L.

AU - Halim, F. X S

AU - Ghani, L.

AU - Delima,

AU - Lestari, W.

AU - Sintawati, F. X.

AU - Kusumawardani, N.

AU - Malik, R.

AU - Santoso, T. S.

AU - Nadjib, M.

AU - Soeroso, S.

AU - Wangsasaputra, F.

AU - Ali, Mohammad

AU - Ivanoff, B.

AU - Galindo, C. M.

AU - Pang, T.

AU - Clemens, J. D.

AU - Suwandono, A.

AU - Acosta, C. J.

PY - 2006/11

Y1 - 2006/11

N2 - Objectives: To report results on coverage, safety and logistics of a large-scale, school-based Vi polysaccharide immunization campaign in North Jakarta. Methods: Of 443 primary schools in North Jakarta, Indonesia, 18 public schools were randomly selected for this study. Exclusion criteria were fever 37.5°C or higher at the time of vaccination or a known history of hypersensitivity to any vaccine. Adverse events were monitored and recorded for 1 month after immunization. Because this was a pilot programme, resource use was tracked in detail. Results: During the February 2004 vaccination campaign, 4828 students were immunized (91% of the target population); another 394 students (7%) were vaccinated during mop-up programmes. Informed consent was obtained for 98% of the target population. In all, 34 adverse events were reported, corresponding to seven events per 1000 doses injected; none was serious. The manufacturer recommended cold chain was maintained throughout the programme. Conclusions: This demonstration project in two sub-districts of North Jakarta shows that a large-scale, school-based typhoid fever Vi polysaccharide vaccination campaign is logistically feasible, safe and minimally disruptive to regular school activities, when used in the context of an existing successful immunization platform. The project had high parental acceptance. Nonetheless, policy-relevant questions still need to be answered before implementing a widespread Vi polysaccharide vaccine programme in Indonesia.

AB - Objectives: To report results on coverage, safety and logistics of a large-scale, school-based Vi polysaccharide immunization campaign in North Jakarta. Methods: Of 443 primary schools in North Jakarta, Indonesia, 18 public schools were randomly selected for this study. Exclusion criteria were fever 37.5°C or higher at the time of vaccination or a known history of hypersensitivity to any vaccine. Adverse events were monitored and recorded for 1 month after immunization. Because this was a pilot programme, resource use was tracked in detail. Results: During the February 2004 vaccination campaign, 4828 students were immunized (91% of the target population); another 394 students (7%) were vaccinated during mop-up programmes. Informed consent was obtained for 98% of the target population. In all, 34 adverse events were reported, corresponding to seven events per 1000 doses injected; none was serious. The manufacturer recommended cold chain was maintained throughout the programme. Conclusions: This demonstration project in two sub-districts of North Jakarta shows that a large-scale, school-based typhoid fever Vi polysaccharide vaccination campaign is logistically feasible, safe and minimally disruptive to regular school activities, when used in the context of an existing successful immunization platform. The project had high parental acceptance. Nonetheless, policy-relevant questions still need to be answered before implementing a widespread Vi polysaccharide vaccine programme in Indonesia.

KW - Indonesia

KW - Mass vaccination

KW - Typhoid fever

KW - Typhoid vi vaccine

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33750006583&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33750006583&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.puhe.2006.06.008

DO - 10.1016/j.puhe.2006.06.008

M3 - Article

C2 - 17005220

AN - SCOPUS:33750006583

VL - 120

SP - 1081

EP - 1087

JO - Public Health

JF - Public Health

SN - 0033-3506

IS - 11

ER -