Intravenous self-injection of four novel phenethylamines in baboons

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Abstract

The present study evaluated the intravenous self-administration of four substituted phenethylamines, using a substitution procedure in baboons. Baboons were trained to self-inject 0.32 mg/kg/injection cocaine under a fixed-ratio (FR) schedule, with a 3 h timeout following each injection. Doses of(±)-N-ethyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine HCl (MDE), (±)-N-hydroxy-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine HCl (N-OH-MDA), (+)-N-N-dimethylamphetamine HCl (NNDMA), and 4-bromo-2,5-dimethyoxy-β-phenethylamine (BDMPEA) and their vehicles were substituted for cocaine for 15 or more successive days. High doses of MDE and N-OH-MDA maintained self-injection; however, NNMA and BDMPEA self-injection was less consistent. NNDMA did not reliably maintain self-injection, whereas one or more doses of BDMPEA maintained self-injection in each of three baboons. Intermediate to high doses of all four compounds decreased food pellet intake maintained under a FR schedule of reinforcement on a different fever. In some baboons, high doses of N-OH-MDA, NNDMA and BDMPEA produced signs of behavioral toxicity (e.g. cyclic pattern of self-injection, behavioral agitation, stereotypical movements) that were similar to those previously observed after administration of high doses of classic psychomotor stimulants such as d-amphetamine; however, the severity and profile of this behavioral toxicity differed between compounds. Thus, the present study documents both similarities and differences in the behavioral profiles of these four phenethylamines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)315-323
Number of pages9
JournalBehavioural Pharmacology
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

Keywords

  • Abuse liability
  • Baboons
  • Cocaine
  • Self-administration
  • Stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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