Intravenous Drug Abuse and One Academic Health Center

Peter E. Dans, Roseanne M. Matricciani, Sharon E. Otter, Daniel S. Reuland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Increasing reports of management problems involving intravenous drug abuse patients prompted our study. From 1983 to 1988, the recorded inpatient prevalence of diagnoses consistent with drug abuse/dependence, other than alcohol or nicotine, rose hospitalwide from 0.6% to 3.5%. Disruptive behavior was documented in the records of 38 of 71 active cocaine or heroin users admitted during 1988 vs 12 of 64 matched control subjects. Care and teaching focused principally on secondary complications of intravenous drug use. Study recommendations included (1) establishment of a comprehensive substance abuse treatment, education, and research program with a dedicated inpatient unit; (2) use of an explicit social contract between patients and care givers; and (3) staff education about legal limits in managing disruptive patients and searching for illegal substances. Primary and secondary prevention, including combating societal enabling of substance abuse, should be the institution’s long-term goals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3173-3176
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume263
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 20 1990

Fingerprint

Intravenous Substance Abuse
Substance-Related Disorders
Inpatients
Education
Heroin
Primary Prevention
Contracts
Secondary Prevention
Nicotine
Cocaine
Caregivers
Patient Care
Teaching
Alcohols
Global Health
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Dans, P. E., Matricciani, R. M., Otter, S. E., & Reuland, D. S. (1990). Intravenous Drug Abuse and One Academic Health Center. Journal of the American Medical Association, 263(23), 3173-3176. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.1990.03440230069035

Intravenous Drug Abuse and One Academic Health Center. / Dans, Peter E.; Matricciani, Roseanne M.; Otter, Sharon E.; Reuland, Daniel S.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 263, No. 23, 20.06.1990, p. 3173-3176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dans, PE, Matricciani, RM, Otter, SE & Reuland, DS 1990, 'Intravenous Drug Abuse and One Academic Health Center', Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 263, no. 23, pp. 3173-3176. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.1990.03440230069035
Dans, Peter E. ; Matricciani, Roseanne M. ; Otter, Sharon E. ; Reuland, Daniel S. / Intravenous Drug Abuse and One Academic Health Center. In: Journal of the American Medical Association. 1990 ; Vol. 263, No. 23. pp. 3173-3176.
@article{e5ad39f670294b85a216927560e4ad7f,
title = "Intravenous Drug Abuse and One Academic Health Center",
abstract = "Increasing reports of management problems involving intravenous drug abuse patients prompted our study. From 1983 to 1988, the recorded inpatient prevalence of diagnoses consistent with drug abuse/dependence, other than alcohol or nicotine, rose hospitalwide from 0.6{\%} to 3.5{\%}. Disruptive behavior was documented in the records of 38 of 71 active cocaine or heroin users admitted during 1988 vs 12 of 64 matched control subjects. Care and teaching focused principally on secondary complications of intravenous drug use. Study recommendations included (1) establishment of a comprehensive substance abuse treatment, education, and research program with a dedicated inpatient unit; (2) use of an explicit social contract between patients and care givers; and (3) staff education about legal limits in managing disruptive patients and searching for illegal substances. Primary and secondary prevention, including combating societal enabling of substance abuse, should be the institution’s long-term goals.",
author = "Dans, {Peter E.} and Matricciani, {Roseanne M.} and Otter, {Sharon E.} and Reuland, {Daniel S.}",
year = "1990",
month = "6",
day = "20",
doi = "10.1001/jama.1990.03440230069035",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "263",
pages = "3173--3176",
journal = "JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association",
issn = "0098-7484",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "23",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Intravenous Drug Abuse and One Academic Health Center

AU - Dans, Peter E.

AU - Matricciani, Roseanne M.

AU - Otter, Sharon E.

AU - Reuland, Daniel S.

PY - 1990/6/20

Y1 - 1990/6/20

N2 - Increasing reports of management problems involving intravenous drug abuse patients prompted our study. From 1983 to 1988, the recorded inpatient prevalence of diagnoses consistent with drug abuse/dependence, other than alcohol or nicotine, rose hospitalwide from 0.6% to 3.5%. Disruptive behavior was documented in the records of 38 of 71 active cocaine or heroin users admitted during 1988 vs 12 of 64 matched control subjects. Care and teaching focused principally on secondary complications of intravenous drug use. Study recommendations included (1) establishment of a comprehensive substance abuse treatment, education, and research program with a dedicated inpatient unit; (2) use of an explicit social contract between patients and care givers; and (3) staff education about legal limits in managing disruptive patients and searching for illegal substances. Primary and secondary prevention, including combating societal enabling of substance abuse, should be the institution’s long-term goals.

AB - Increasing reports of management problems involving intravenous drug abuse patients prompted our study. From 1983 to 1988, the recorded inpatient prevalence of diagnoses consistent with drug abuse/dependence, other than alcohol or nicotine, rose hospitalwide from 0.6% to 3.5%. Disruptive behavior was documented in the records of 38 of 71 active cocaine or heroin users admitted during 1988 vs 12 of 64 matched control subjects. Care and teaching focused principally on secondary complications of intravenous drug use. Study recommendations included (1) establishment of a comprehensive substance abuse treatment, education, and research program with a dedicated inpatient unit; (2) use of an explicit social contract between patients and care givers; and (3) staff education about legal limits in managing disruptive patients and searching for illegal substances. Primary and secondary prevention, including combating societal enabling of substance abuse, should be the institution’s long-term goals.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025307296&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025307296&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1001/jama.1990.03440230069035

DO - 10.1001/jama.1990.03440230069035

M3 - Article

C2 - 2348527

AN - SCOPUS:0025307296

VL - 263

SP - 3173

EP - 3176

JO - JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

JF - JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

SN - 0098-7484

IS - 23

ER -