Intraosseous infusion: Success of a standardized regional training program for prehospital advanced life support providers

Thomas E. Anderson, Kevin Arthur, Michael Kleinman, Rodney Drawbaugh, David R. Eitel, Cynthia S. Ogden, Mark Douglas Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Study objective: To evaluate a standardized training program in intraosseous (IO) infusion for prehospital providers. Design: Prospective multicenter 24-month study. Setting: IO infusions were performed by prehospital providers from eight advanced life support units serving 14 hospitals within nine counties. Participants: Field advanced life support providers (paramedics and registered nurses). Interventions: All providers participated in a one-hour standardized training session and supervised hands-on simulation. Providers completed a data sheet on all IO infusions performed. Data sheets were collected and summarized. Results: One hundred thirty-four prehospital providers completed the training session and were approved to perform the procedure. Fifteen patients requiring IO infision were encountered during the study period. Thirteen (87%) had IO infusion completed successfully. Clinical indications included 11 patients in cardiac arrest, two trauma resuscitations, one seizure, and one toxic ingestion. Patient ages ranged from 1 to 24 months. Seven patients were initially resuscitated. Four survived to hospital discharge. Procedural complications included one incidence of local fluid extravasation and one IO line that became dislodged en route. There were no complications at time of discharge in the four survivors. All procedures were performed in less than two minutes. Conclusion: A one-hour standardized training session was successfully used to train prehospital providers in the procedure of IO infusion. IO infusion then was implemented into their clinical practice with a satisfactory success rate and few complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)52-55
Number of pages4
JournalAnnals of Emergency Medicine
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Intraosseous Infusions
Education
Allied Health Personnel
Poisons
Heart Arrest
Resuscitation
Survivors
Seizures
Eating
Nurses
Incidence
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Intraosseous infusion : Success of a standardized regional training program for prehospital advanced life support providers. / Anderson, Thomas E.; Arthur, Kevin; Kleinman, Michael; Drawbaugh, Rodney; Eitel, David R.; Ogden, Cynthia S.; Baker, Mark Douglas.

In: Annals of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 23, No. 1, 1994, p. 52-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Anderson, Thomas E. ; Arthur, Kevin ; Kleinman, Michael ; Drawbaugh, Rodney ; Eitel, David R. ; Ogden, Cynthia S. ; Baker, Mark Douglas. / Intraosseous infusion : Success of a standardized regional training program for prehospital advanced life support providers. In: Annals of Emergency Medicine. 1994 ; Vol. 23, No. 1. pp. 52-55.
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abstract = "Study objective: To evaluate a standardized training program in intraosseous (IO) infusion for prehospital providers. Design: Prospective multicenter 24-month study. Setting: IO infusions were performed by prehospital providers from eight advanced life support units serving 14 hospitals within nine counties. Participants: Field advanced life support providers (paramedics and registered nurses). Interventions: All providers participated in a one-hour standardized training session and supervised hands-on simulation. Providers completed a data sheet on all IO infusions performed. Data sheets were collected and summarized. Results: One hundred thirty-four prehospital providers completed the training session and were approved to perform the procedure. Fifteen patients requiring IO infision were encountered during the study period. Thirteen (87{\%}) had IO infusion completed successfully. Clinical indications included 11 patients in cardiac arrest, two trauma resuscitations, one seizure, and one toxic ingestion. Patient ages ranged from 1 to 24 months. Seven patients were initially resuscitated. Four survived to hospital discharge. Procedural complications included one incidence of local fluid extravasation and one IO line that became dislodged en route. There were no complications at time of discharge in the four survivors. All procedures were performed in less than two minutes. Conclusion: A one-hour standardized training session was successfully used to train prehospital providers in the procedure of IO infusion. IO infusion then was implemented into their clinical practice with a satisfactory success rate and few complications.",
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