Intraoperative hemodilution and autologous platelet rich plasma collection: Two techniques for collecting fresh autologous blood

Darrell J. Triulzi, Paul Michael Ness

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Intraoperative hemodilution (IH) and autologous platelet rich plasma (APRP) collection are two techniques used to obtain autologous blood in the operating room. They have been used to reduce allogeneic blood exposure in patients undergoing both cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. Both components have the advantage of providing fresh blood not subject to the storage lesion. Whole blood (IH) or platelet rich plasma is removed from the patient as anesthesia is induced and replaced with acellular fluid. The blood is transfused back after bypass or major bleeding has ceased. Although used commonly, the data supporting the use of either technique are controversial. Methodologic problems which have confounded studies evaluating their utility include: poorly defined transfusion criteria, concommitant use of other blood conservation techniques (i.e. cell salvage, pharmacologic agents, hypothermia, controlled hypotension) and changing transfusion practices with greater tolerance of normovolemic anemia. Randomized controlled studies with well defined up to date transfusion criteria are needed to identify patients likely to benefit from these techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-44
Number of pages12
JournalTransfusion Science
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Hemodilution
Platelet-Rich Plasma
Controlled Hypotension
Operating Rooms
Hypothermia
Anemia
Anesthesia
Hemorrhage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Hematology

Cite this

Intraoperative hemodilution and autologous platelet rich plasma collection : Two techniques for collecting fresh autologous blood. / Triulzi, Darrell J.; Ness, Paul Michael.

In: Transfusion Science, Vol. 16, No. 1, 1995, p. 33-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{866f0fd1b2b5439093ffc295bbd9e8dc,
title = "Intraoperative hemodilution and autologous platelet rich plasma collection: Two techniques for collecting fresh autologous blood",
abstract = "Intraoperative hemodilution (IH) and autologous platelet rich plasma (APRP) collection are two techniques used to obtain autologous blood in the operating room. They have been used to reduce allogeneic blood exposure in patients undergoing both cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. Both components have the advantage of providing fresh blood not subject to the storage lesion. Whole blood (IH) or platelet rich plasma is removed from the patient as anesthesia is induced and replaced with acellular fluid. The blood is transfused back after bypass or major bleeding has ceased. Although used commonly, the data supporting the use of either technique are controversial. Methodologic problems which have confounded studies evaluating their utility include: poorly defined transfusion criteria, concommitant use of other blood conservation techniques (i.e. cell salvage, pharmacologic agents, hypothermia, controlled hypotension) and changing transfusion practices with greater tolerance of normovolemic anemia. Randomized controlled studies with well defined up to date transfusion criteria are needed to identify patients likely to benefit from these techniques.",
author = "Triulzi, {Darrell J.} and Ness, {Paul Michael}",
year = "1995",
doi = "10.1016/0955-3886(94)00058-R",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "33--44",
journal = "Transfusion and Apheresis Science",
issn = "1473-0502",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Intraoperative hemodilution and autologous platelet rich plasma collection

T2 - Two techniques for collecting fresh autologous blood

AU - Triulzi, Darrell J.

AU - Ness, Paul Michael

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - Intraoperative hemodilution (IH) and autologous platelet rich plasma (APRP) collection are two techniques used to obtain autologous blood in the operating room. They have been used to reduce allogeneic blood exposure in patients undergoing both cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. Both components have the advantage of providing fresh blood not subject to the storage lesion. Whole blood (IH) or platelet rich plasma is removed from the patient as anesthesia is induced and replaced with acellular fluid. The blood is transfused back after bypass or major bleeding has ceased. Although used commonly, the data supporting the use of either technique are controversial. Methodologic problems which have confounded studies evaluating their utility include: poorly defined transfusion criteria, concommitant use of other blood conservation techniques (i.e. cell salvage, pharmacologic agents, hypothermia, controlled hypotension) and changing transfusion practices with greater tolerance of normovolemic anemia. Randomized controlled studies with well defined up to date transfusion criteria are needed to identify patients likely to benefit from these techniques.

AB - Intraoperative hemodilution (IH) and autologous platelet rich plasma (APRP) collection are two techniques used to obtain autologous blood in the operating room. They have been used to reduce allogeneic blood exposure in patients undergoing both cardiac and non-cardiac surgery. Both components have the advantage of providing fresh blood not subject to the storage lesion. Whole blood (IH) or platelet rich plasma is removed from the patient as anesthesia is induced and replaced with acellular fluid. The blood is transfused back after bypass or major bleeding has ceased. Although used commonly, the data supporting the use of either technique are controversial. Methodologic problems which have confounded studies evaluating their utility include: poorly defined transfusion criteria, concommitant use of other blood conservation techniques (i.e. cell salvage, pharmacologic agents, hypothermia, controlled hypotension) and changing transfusion practices with greater tolerance of normovolemic anemia. Randomized controlled studies with well defined up to date transfusion criteria are needed to identify patients likely to benefit from these techniques.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028986506&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028986506&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0955-3886(94)00058-R

DO - 10.1016/0955-3886(94)00058-R

M3 - Article

C2 - 10172465

AN - SCOPUS:0028986506

VL - 16

SP - 33

EP - 44

JO - Transfusion and Apheresis Science

JF - Transfusion and Apheresis Science

SN - 1473-0502

IS - 1

ER -