Intraoperative Endoscopic Botox Injection during Total Esophagectomy Prevents the Need for Pyloromyotomy or Dilatation

Hans F. Fuchs, Ryan C. Broderick, Cristina R. Harnsberger, Francisco Alvarez Divo, Alisa Coker, Garth R. Jacobsen, Bryan J. Sandler, Michael Bouvet, Santiago Horgan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Esophagectomy may lead to impairment in gastric emptying unless pyloric drainage is performed. Pyloric drainage may be technically challenging during minimally invasive esophagectomy and can add morbidity. We sought to determine the effectiveness of intraoperative endoscopic injection of botulinum toxin into the pylorus during robotic-assisted esophagectomy as an alternative to surgical pyloric drainage. Materials and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the distal esophagus or gastroesophageal junction who underwent robotic-assisted transhiatal esophagectomy (RATE) without any surgical pyloric drainage. Patients with and without intraoperative endoscopic injection of 200 units of botulinum toxin in 10 cc of saline (BOTOX group) were compared to those that did not receive any pyloric drainage (noBOTOX group). Main outcome measure was the incidence of postoperative pyloric stenosis; secondary outcomes included operative and oncologic parameters, length of stay (LOS), morbidity, and mortality. Results: From November 2006 to August 2014, 41 patients (6 females) with a mean age of 65 years underwent RATE without surgical drainage of the pylorus. There were 14 patients in the BOTOX group and 27 patients in the noBOTOX group. Mean operative time was not different between the comparison groups. There was one conversion to open surgery in the BOTOX group. No pyloric dysfunction occurred in the BOTOX group postoperatively, and eight stenoses in the noBOTOX group (30%) required endoscopic therapy (P < .05). There were no differences in incidence of anastomotic strictures or anastomotic leaks. One patient in group noBOTOX required pyloroplasty 3 months after esophagectomy. There was one death in the noBOTOX group postoperatively (30-day mortality 2.4%). Mean LOS was 9.6 days, and BOTOX patients were discharged earlier (7.4 versus 10.7, P < .05). Conclusion: Intraoperative endoscopic injection of botulinum toxin into the pylorus during RATE is feasible, safe, and effective and can prevent the need for pyloromyotomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)433-438
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Laparoendoscopic and Advanced Surgical Techniques
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Intraoperative Endoscopic Botox Injection during Total Esophagectomy Prevents the Need for Pyloromyotomy or Dilatation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this