Intranasal nicotine spray does not augment the adverse effects of cigarette smoking on myocardial oxygen demand or coronary arterial dimensions

Ellen C. Keeley, Mark J. Pirwitz, Charles Landau, Richard A. Lange, L. David Hillis, Ebb H. Foerster, Kelly Conrad, John E. Willard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

PURPOSE: Nicotine replacement therapy has become a popular therapy for smokers attempting to stop smoking. Unfortunately, some subjects continue to smoke while receiving it. Since nicotine is believed to be the primary constituent of cigarette smoke responsible for its acute adverse effects on myocardial oxygen supply and demand, concomitant nicotine replacement therapy and smoking theoretically could provoke a marked decrease in myocardial oxygen supply and increase in demand. This study was performed to assess the effects of cigarette smoking with and without concomitant intranasal nicotine spray on: (a) myocardial oxygen demand, (b) coronary arterial dimensions, and (c) the development of acute cardiovascular tolerance. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In 19 smokers referred for cardiac catheterization for the evaluation of chest pain, we assessed the effects of cigarette smoking with and without concomitant intranasal nicotine spray on: (a) heart rate-systolic arterial pressure product (an estimate of myocardial oxygen demand), (b) coronary arterial dimensions (measured with computer-assisted quantitative arteriography), and (c) the development of acute cardiovascular tolerance. RESULTS: Smoking a first cigarette increased rate pressure product (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)357-363
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Medicine
Volume101
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1996
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

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