Intramuscular electrical stimulation for shoulder pain in hemiplegia

Does time from stroke onset predict treatment success?

John Chae, Alan Ng, David T. Yu, Andrew Kirsteins, Elie P. Elovic, Steven R. Flanagan, Richard L. Harvey, Richard D. Zorowitz, Zi Ping Fang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background. A randomized clinical has shown the effectiveness of intramuscular electrical stimulation for the treatment of poststroke shoulder pain. Objective. Identify predictors of treatment success and assess the impact of the strongest predictor on outcomes. Method. This is a secondary analysis of a multisite randomized clinical trial of intramuscular electrical stimulation for poststroke shoulder pain. The study included 61 chronic stroke survivors with shoulder pain randomized to a 6-week course of intramuscular electrical stimulation (n = 32) versus a hemisling (n = 29). The primary outcome measure was Brief Pain Inventory Question 12. Treatment success was defined as <2-point reduction in this measure at end of treatment and at 3, 6, and 12 months posttreatment. Forward stepwise regression was used to identify factors predictive of treatment success among participants assigned to the electrical stimulation group. The factor most predictive of treatment success was used as an explanatory variable, and the clinical trials data were reanalyzed. Results. Time from stroke onset was most predictive of treatment success. Subjects were divided according to the median value of stroke onset: early ( 77 weeks). Electrical stimulation was effective in reducing poststroke shoulder pain for the early group (94% vs 7%, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)561-567
Number of pages7
JournalNeurorehabilitation and Neural Repair
Volume21
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007

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Shoulder Pain
Hemiplegia
Electric Stimulation
Stroke
Therapeutics
Randomized Controlled Trials
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Clinical Trials
Pain
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Electrical stimulation
  • Poststroke shoulder pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Intramuscular electrical stimulation for shoulder pain in hemiplegia : Does time from stroke onset predict treatment success? / Chae, John; Ng, Alan; Yu, David T.; Kirsteins, Andrew; Elovic, Elie P.; Flanagan, Steven R.; Harvey, Richard L.; Zorowitz, Richard D.; Fang, Zi Ping.

In: Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, Vol. 21, No. 6, 11.2007, p. 561-567.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chae, J, Ng, A, Yu, DT, Kirsteins, A, Elovic, EP, Flanagan, SR, Harvey, RL, Zorowitz, RD & Fang, ZP 2007, 'Intramuscular electrical stimulation for shoulder pain in hemiplegia: Does time from stroke onset predict treatment success?', Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, vol. 21, no. 6, pp. 561-567. https://doi.org/10.1177/1545968306298412
Chae, John ; Ng, Alan ; Yu, David T. ; Kirsteins, Andrew ; Elovic, Elie P. ; Flanagan, Steven R. ; Harvey, Richard L. ; Zorowitz, Richard D. ; Fang, Zi Ping. / Intramuscular electrical stimulation for shoulder pain in hemiplegia : Does time from stroke onset predict treatment success?. In: Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair. 2007 ; Vol. 21, No. 6. pp. 561-567.
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