Intimate Partner Violence, Sexual Autonomy and Postpartum STD Prevention Among Young Couples: A Mediation Analysis

Tiara C. Willie, Tamora A. Callands, Trace S. Kershaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

CONTEXT: The transition to parenthood is a stressful time for young couples and can put them at risk for acquiring STDs. Mechanisms underlying this risk—particularly, intimate partner violence (IPV) and sexual autonomy—have not been well studied. METHODS: Between 2007 and 2011, a prospective cohort study of the relationships and health of pregnant adolescents and their male partners recruited 296 couples at four hospital-based obstetrics and gynecology clinics in the U.S. Northeast; participants were followed up six and 12 months after the birth. Structural equation modeling identified associations among IPV at baseline and six months, sexual autonomy at six months and STD acquisition at 12 months. Mediating effects of sexual autonomy were tested via bootstrapping. RESULTS: Females were aged 14–21, and male partners were 14 or older. For females, IPV victimization at baseline was positively associated with the likelihood of acquiring a postpartum STD (coefficient, 0.4); level of sexual autonomy was inversely associated with the likelihood of acquiring an STD and of having a male partner who acquired one by the 12-month follow-up (–0.4 for each). For males, IPV victimization at baseline was negatively correlated with a female partner's sexual autonomy (–0.3) and likelihood of acquiring an STD (–0.7); victimization at six months was positively related to a partner's sexual autonomy (0.2). Sexual autonomy did not mediate these relationships. CONCLUSIONS: Females' sexual autonomy appears to protect against postpartum STDs for both partners. Future research should explore the efficacy of IPV-informed approaches to improving women's sexual and reproductive health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-32
Number of pages8
JournalPerspectives on sexual and reproductive health
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2018
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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