Intimate Partner Violence Against Low-Income Women in Mexico City and Associations with Child School Attendance: A Latent Class Analysis Using Cross-sectional Data

Anna Scolese, Tiara C. Willie, Kathryn L. Falb, Heather Sipsma, Paola Abril Campos, Claudia Diaz Olavarrieta, Jhumka Gupta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Few studies have investigated how intimate partner violence (IPV), and patterns of IPV experiences, may impact children’s school attendance in low- and middle-income countries. Methods: Using baseline data from a sub-sample of 659 women in Mexico City enrolled in a randomized controlled trial who reported having a child under age 18 and in school, multilevel latent class analysis (LCA) was used to classify women based on their reported IPV experiences. Multilevel risk regression analyses examined associations between latent class membership and IPV-related disruptions in children’s schooling. Latent classes were identified in a prior study. Results: Overall, 23.3% of women reported their child’s school attendance was disrupted due to IPV. LCA identified four distinct classes of IPV experiences: Low Physical and Sexual Violence (39.1%); Low Physical and High Sexual Violence class (14.8%), High Physical and Low Sexual Violence and Injuries (36.5%); and High Physical and Sexual Violence and Injuries (9.6%). Compared with women in the Low Physical and Sexual Violence class, women in the High Physical and Sexual Violence and Injuries class and women in the High Physical and Low Sexual Violence and Injuries class were at greater risk of IPV disrupting children’s school attendance (ARR 3.39, 95% CI 2.34, 4.92; ARR 2.22, 95% CI 1.54, 3.19, respectively). No other statistically significant associations emerged. Discussion: High disruptions in children’s school attendance due to IPV were reported and were differentially related to patterns of IPV experiences. Findings underscore the need to understand underlying mechanisms. Future work integrating both violence against women and violence against children is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)360-368
Number of pages9
JournalMaternal and child health journal
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Child health
  • Education
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Latent class analysis
  • Mexico
  • School health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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