Intestinal Parasites in a Migrant Farmworker Population

Beth L P Ungar, Ellen Iscoe, Jane Cutler, John Bartlett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Three hundred thirty-nine migrant worker women and children were screened by single stool examination for intestinal parasites. Infection occurred in 34.2%. Giardia lamblia and Trichuris trichiura were the most common pathogens; Entamoeba coli and Endolimax nana were the most common commensals. Infants under 1 year of age were free of infection. Children between 2 and 5 years old and women between 25 and 35 years old had the highest prevalence. Significantly more Haitians were infected than Mexican-Americans or American blacks. Of ten symptoms, only abdominal pain and gas correlated significantly with infection. This migrant population has a greater prevalence of intestinal parasites than the general American public. Screening by stool examination may be beneficial to diminish the reservoir of infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)513-515
Number of pages3
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume146
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1986

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Parasites
Infection
Population
Endolimax
Entamoeba
Trichuris
Giardia lamblia
Abdominal Pain
Gases
Farmers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Intestinal Parasites in a Migrant Farmworker Population. / Ungar, Beth L P; Iscoe, Ellen; Cutler, Jane; Bartlett, John.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 146, No. 3, 1986, p. 513-515.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ungar, Beth L P ; Iscoe, Ellen ; Cutler, Jane ; Bartlett, John. / Intestinal Parasites in a Migrant Farmworker Population. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 1986 ; Vol. 146, No. 3. pp. 513-515.
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