Intestinal microbiota-produced trimethylamine-N-oxide and its association with coronary stenosis and HIV serostatus

P. Elliott Miller, Sabina A. Haberlen, Todd T. Brown, Joseph B. Margolick, Joseph A. DiDonato, Stanley L. Hazen, Mallory D. Witt, Lawrence A. Kingsley, Frank J. Palella, Matthew Budoff, Lisa P. Jacobson, Wendy S. Post, Cynthia L. Sears

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent evidence has shown a complex relationship between the gut microbiota, dietary nutrients, and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) production, initiated by the microbiota, has been associated with CVD events. We sought to test if this association exists in HIV-infected persons. After adjusting for aspirin use and CVD risk factors, HIV-infected men were more likely to have coronary stenosis in the second and third TMAO quartiles compared with the first quartile, but did not differ significantly in the fourth quartile. We found an inverted U-shaped association between TMAO levels and the presence of coronary artery stenosis among HIV-infected men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)114-118
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Volume72
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

Keywords

  • Coronary artery disease
  • HIV
  • Trimethylamine-N-oxide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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