Intersections of ethnicity and social class in provider advice regarding reproductive health

Roberta A. Downing, Thomas A. LaVeist, Heather E. Bullock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. We examined how ethnicity and social class influence women's perceptions of reproductive health care. Of primary interest was assessing whether health care providers are perceived as advising low-income women, particularly women of color, to limit their childbearing and to what extent they feel they are discouraged by providers from having future children. Methods. Ethnically diverse, low-income (n=193) and middle-class women (n=146) completed a questionnaire about their pregnancy-related health care experiences. Results. Logistic regression analyses revealed that low-income women of color experienced greater odds of being advised to limit their childbearing than did middle-class White women. A separate model demonstrated that low-income Latinas reported greater odds of being discouraged from having children than did middle-class White women. Conclusions. Low-income women of color were more likely to report being advised to limit their childbearing and were more likely to describe being discouraged from having children than were middle-class White women. More research is needed regarding how ethnicity and social class impact women's experiences with reproductive health care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1803-1807
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume97
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 10 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Reproductive Health
Social Class
Color
Delivery of Health Care
Hispanic Americans
Health Personnel
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Intersections of ethnicity and social class in provider advice regarding reproductive health. / Downing, Roberta A.; LaVeist, Thomas A.; Bullock, Heather E.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 97, No. 10, 10.01.2007, p. 1803-1807.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Downing, Roberta A. ; LaVeist, Thomas A. ; Bullock, Heather E. / Intersections of ethnicity and social class in provider advice regarding reproductive health. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2007 ; Vol. 97, No. 10. pp. 1803-1807.
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