Interpersonal suicide risk for american indians: Investigating thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness

Victoria O'Keefe, La Ricka R Wingate, Raymond P. Tucker, Sarah Rhoades-Kerswill, Meredith L. Slish, Collin L. Davidson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

American Indians (AIs) experience increased suicide rates compared with other groups in the United States. However, no past studies have examined AI suicide by way of a recent empirically supported theoretical model of suicide. The current study investigated whether AI suicidal ideation can be predicted by two components: thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness, from the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide (T. E. Joiner, 2005, Why people die by suicide. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press). One hundred seventy-one AIs representing 27 different tribes participated in an online survey. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that perceived burdensomeness significantly predicted suicidal ideation above and beyond demographic variables and depressive symptoms; however, thwarted belongingness did not. Additionally, the two-way interaction between thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness significantly predicted suicidal ideation. These results provide initial support for continued research on the components of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide, an empirically supported theoretical model of suicide, to predict suicidal ideation among AI populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)61-67
Number of pages7
JournalCultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • American indian
  • Interpersona
  • Native american
  • Suicide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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