International military human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome policies and programs: Strengths and limitations in current practice

Rodger Yeager, Craig W. Hendrix, Stuart Kingma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A survey was conducted to evaluate military human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) policies and programs in 119 countries. Ninety-eight percent of the 62 respondents provide prevention education, 95% in group settings but only 53% individually. Predeployment briefings are more common than postdeployment briefings. Condoms are promoted more often than provided. Seventy-eight respondents report some form of mandatory HIV testing, and 58% perform mandatory recruit testing, with recruitment denied to HIV-positive individuals in 17%. Counseling accompanies mandatory testing less than voluntary testing. In-service care for AIDS patients is universal. Many military prevention programs can be improved through postdeployment briefings and proactive interventions involving education, condom distribution, and counseling combined with testing. Mandatory testing is often inconsistent with stated goals, and AIDS care policies may strain military budgets. Testing based on cost-benefit assessments may increase efficiency in military HIV control. Military budgets may benefit from greater civil-military cost sharing in AIDS care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-92
Number of pages6
JournalMilitary medicine
Volume165
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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