Internal jugular vein volume during head-down tilt and carbon dioxide exposure in the SPACECOT study

The SPACECOT Investigators Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cerebral hemodynamics and venous outflow from the brain may be altered during exposure to microgravity or head-down tilt (HDT), an analog of microgravity, as well as by increased ambient CO2 exposure as experienced on the International Space Station. METHODS: Six healthy subjects underwent baseline tilt table testing at 0°, 6°, 12°, 18°, 24°, and 30° HDT. The right internal jugular (IJ) vein cross-sectional area (CSA) was measured at four intervals from the submandibular to the clavicular level and IJ volume was calculated. Further measurements of the IJ vein were made after ~26 h of 12° HDT bed rest with either ambient air or 0.5% CO2 exposure, and plasma and blood volume were assessed after 4 h, 24 h, and 28.5 h HDT. RESULTS: IJ vein CSA and volume increased with progressively steeper HDT angles during baseline tilt table testing, with more prominent filling of the IJ vein at levels closer to the clavicle. Exposure to 26 h of 12° HDT bed rest with or without increased CO2, however, had little additional effect on the IJ vein. Further, bed rest resulted in a decrease in plasma volume and blood volume, although changes did not depend on atmospheric conditioning or correlate directly with changes in IJ vein CSA or volume. DISCUSSION: The hydrostatic effects of HDT can be clearly determined through measurement of the IJ vein CSA and volume; however, IJ vein dimensions may not be a reliable indicator of systemic fluid status during bed rest.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-356
Number of pages6
JournalAerospace medicine and human performance
Volume89
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Head-Down Tilt
Jugular Veins
Carbon Dioxide
Bed Rest
Weightlessness
Plasma Volume
Clavicle
Blood Volume
Healthy Volunteers
Neck
Hemodynamics
Air

Keywords

  • Analog
  • Cerebral hemodynamics
  • Cross sectional area
  • Plasma volume
  • Spaceflight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Internal jugular vein volume during head-down tilt and carbon dioxide exposure in the SPACECOT study. / The SPACECOT Investigators Group.

In: Aerospace medicine and human performance, Vol. 89, No. 4, 01.04.2018, p. 351-356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Cerebral hemodynamics and venous outflow from the brain may be altered during exposure to microgravity or head-down tilt (HDT), an analog of microgravity, as well as by increased ambient CO2 exposure as experienced on the International Space Station. METHODS: Six healthy subjects underwent baseline tilt table testing at 0°, 6°, 12°, 18°, 24°, and 30° HDT. The right internal jugular (IJ) vein cross-sectional area (CSA) was measured at four intervals from the submandibular to the clavicular level and IJ volume was calculated. Further measurements of the IJ vein were made after ~26 h of 12° HDT bed rest with either ambient air or 0.5{\%} CO2 exposure, and plasma and blood volume were assessed after 4 h, 24 h, and 28.5 h HDT. RESULTS: IJ vein CSA and volume increased with progressively steeper HDT angles during baseline tilt table testing, with more prominent filling of the IJ vein at levels closer to the clavicle. Exposure to 26 h of 12° HDT bed rest with or without increased CO2, however, had little additional effect on the IJ vein. Further, bed rest resulted in a decrease in plasma volume and blood volume, although changes did not depend on atmospheric conditioning or correlate directly with changes in IJ vein CSA or volume. DISCUSSION: The hydrostatic effects of HDT can be clearly determined through measurement of the IJ vein CSA and volume; however, IJ vein dimensions may not be a reliable indicator of systemic fluid status during bed rest.",
keywords = "Analog, Cerebral hemodynamics, Cross sectional area, Plasma volume, Spaceflight",
author = "{The SPACECOT Investigators Group} and Karina Marshall-Goebel and Brian Stevens and Rao, {Chethan Venkatasubba} and Jose Suarez and Eusebia Calvillo and Philippe Arbeille and Haleh Sangi-Haghpeykar and Donoviel, {Dorit B.} and Edwin Mulder and Bershad, {Eric M.} and Mathias Basner and Christine Becker and Jonathan Clark and Rahul Damani and Wolfgang Doering and Christian Dohmen and Petra Frings-Meuthen and Peter Gauger and Darius Gerlach and Olga Hand and Khader Hasan and Elfriede Huth and Bernd Johannes and Larry Kramer and Gabriele Kraus and Ulrich Limper and Uwe Mittag and Klaus Muller and Jad Nasrini and Ben Niederberger and Dirk Poddig and Matthias Putzke and J{\"o}rn Rittweger and Martina Sagner and Irmtrud Schrage-Knoll and Wolfram Sies and Claudia Stern and Henning Stetefeld and Gary Strangman and {von Waechter}, Annette and Tobias Weber and Martin Wittkowski and Rupert Gerzer and Julie Do and Jeff Sutton",
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AU - Marshall-Goebel, Karina

AU - Stevens, Brian

AU - Rao, Chethan Venkatasubba

AU - Suarez, Jose

AU - Calvillo, Eusebia

AU - Arbeille, Philippe

AU - Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh

AU - Donoviel, Dorit B.

AU - Mulder, Edwin

AU - Bershad, Eric M.

AU - Basner, Mathias

AU - Becker, Christine

AU - Clark, Jonathan

AU - Damani, Rahul

AU - Doering, Wolfgang

AU - Dohmen, Christian

AU - Frings-Meuthen, Petra

AU - Gauger, Peter

AU - Gerlach, Darius

AU - Hand, Olga

AU - Hasan, Khader

AU - Huth, Elfriede

AU - Johannes, Bernd

AU - Kramer, Larry

AU - Kraus, Gabriele

AU - Limper, Ulrich

AU - Mittag, Uwe

AU - Muller, Klaus

AU - Nasrini, Jad

AU - Niederberger, Ben

AU - Poddig, Dirk

AU - Putzke, Matthias

AU - Rittweger, Jörn

AU - Sagner, Martina

AU - Schrage-Knoll, Irmtrud

AU - Sies, Wolfram

AU - Stern, Claudia

AU - Stetefeld, Henning

AU - Strangman, Gary

AU - von Waechter, Annette

AU - Weber, Tobias

AU - Wittkowski, Martin

AU - Gerzer, Rupert

AU - Do, Julie

AU - Sutton, Jeff

PY - 2018/4/1

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Cerebral hemodynamics and venous outflow from the brain may be altered during exposure to microgravity or head-down tilt (HDT), an analog of microgravity, as well as by increased ambient CO2 exposure as experienced on the International Space Station. METHODS: Six healthy subjects underwent baseline tilt table testing at 0°, 6°, 12°, 18°, 24°, and 30° HDT. The right internal jugular (IJ) vein cross-sectional area (CSA) was measured at four intervals from the submandibular to the clavicular level and IJ volume was calculated. Further measurements of the IJ vein were made after ~26 h of 12° HDT bed rest with either ambient air or 0.5% CO2 exposure, and plasma and blood volume were assessed after 4 h, 24 h, and 28.5 h HDT. RESULTS: IJ vein CSA and volume increased with progressively steeper HDT angles during baseline tilt table testing, with more prominent filling of the IJ vein at levels closer to the clavicle. Exposure to 26 h of 12° HDT bed rest with or without increased CO2, however, had little additional effect on the IJ vein. Further, bed rest resulted in a decrease in plasma volume and blood volume, although changes did not depend on atmospheric conditioning or correlate directly with changes in IJ vein CSA or volume. DISCUSSION: The hydrostatic effects of HDT can be clearly determined through measurement of the IJ vein CSA and volume; however, IJ vein dimensions may not be a reliable indicator of systemic fluid status during bed rest.

AB - BACKGROUND: Cerebral hemodynamics and venous outflow from the brain may be altered during exposure to microgravity or head-down tilt (HDT), an analog of microgravity, as well as by increased ambient CO2 exposure as experienced on the International Space Station. METHODS: Six healthy subjects underwent baseline tilt table testing at 0°, 6°, 12°, 18°, 24°, and 30° HDT. The right internal jugular (IJ) vein cross-sectional area (CSA) was measured at four intervals from the submandibular to the clavicular level and IJ volume was calculated. Further measurements of the IJ vein were made after ~26 h of 12° HDT bed rest with either ambient air or 0.5% CO2 exposure, and plasma and blood volume were assessed after 4 h, 24 h, and 28.5 h HDT. RESULTS: IJ vein CSA and volume increased with progressively steeper HDT angles during baseline tilt table testing, with more prominent filling of the IJ vein at levels closer to the clavicle. Exposure to 26 h of 12° HDT bed rest with or without increased CO2, however, had little additional effect on the IJ vein. Further, bed rest resulted in a decrease in plasma volume and blood volume, although changes did not depend on atmospheric conditioning or correlate directly with changes in IJ vein CSA or volume. DISCUSSION: The hydrostatic effects of HDT can be clearly determined through measurement of the IJ vein CSA and volume; however, IJ vein dimensions may not be a reliable indicator of systemic fluid status during bed rest.

KW - Analog

KW - Cerebral hemodynamics

KW - Cross sectional area

KW - Plasma volume

KW - Spaceflight

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