Intermittent fasting dissociates beneficial effects of dietary restriction on glucose metabolism and neuronal resistance to injury from calorie intake

R. Michael Anson, Zhihong Guo, Rafael de Cabo, Titilola Iyun, Michelle Rios, Adrienne Hagepanos, Donald K. Ingram, Mark A. Lane, Mark P. Mattson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Dietary restriction has been shown to have several health benefits including increased insulin sensitivity, stress resistance, reduced morbidity, and increased life span. The mechanism remains unknown, but the need for a long-term reduction in caloric intake to achieve these benefits has been assumed. We report that when C57BL/6 mice are maintained on an intermittent fasting (alternate-day fasting) dietary-restriction regimen their overall food intake is not decreased and their body weight is maintained. Nevertheless, intermittent fasting resulted in beneficial effects that met or exceeded those of caloric restriction including reduced serum glucose and insulin levels and increased resistance of neurons in the brain to excitotoxic stress. Intermittent fasting therefore has beneficial effects on glucose regulation and neuronal resistance to injury in these mice that are independent of caloric intake.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6216-6220
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume100
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 13 2003
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • β-hydroxybutyrate
  • Caloric restriction
  • Hippocampus
  • Insulin
  • Ketosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

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