Intermediate-term outcomes associated with kidney transplantation in recipients 80 years and older: An analysis of the OPTN/UNOS database

Edmund Huang, Neda Poommipanit, Marcelo S. Sampaio, Hung Tien Kuo, Pavani Reddy, Hans Albin Gritsch, Phuong Thu Pham, Alan Wilkinson, Gabriel Danovitch, Suphamai Bunnapradist

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background. An increasing number of patients 80 years and older have received a kidney transplant in the United States, but their outcomes are not well described. Using Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network/United Network of Organ Sharing data, outcomes of recipients 80 years and older were evaluated. Methods. Thirty-one thousand one hundred seventy-nine elderly recipients defined by age 60 years and older receiving kidney transplants from 2000 to 2008 were stratified: ages 60 to 69 years (n=24,877), 70 to 79 years (n=6,103), and 80 years and older (n=199). Cox regression models were used to compare patient, graft, and death-censored graft survival. Results. The majority of recipients 80 years and older was male (82.9%), white (87.9%), and less likely to have diabetes or coronary artery disease. More expanded criteria donor (ECD) but fewer living donor transplants were performed among 80 years and older compared with those younger than 80 years. Perioperative mortality, defined as death within 30 days posttransplant, was rare (60-69 years: 1.4%; 70-79 years: 1.5%; and 80 years: 2.5%) but tended to be higher among those 80 years and older compared with recipients 60 to 69 years (hazard ratio [HR] 1.67; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.69-4.05). At 2 years, survival was lower for 80 years and older (73%; HR 2.42; 95% CI 1.91-3.06) and 70 to 79 years (86%; HR: 1.42; 95% CI: 1.34-1.51) compared with recipients 60 to 69 years (89%). There was a greater risk of graft loss among recipients 80 years and older compared with those 60 to 69 years (HR 1.78; 95% CI 1.42-2.23); however, no difference in death-censored graft survival was observed (0.89; 0.57-1.39). Among recipients 80 years and older, no difference in survival was observed between standard criteria donor and ECD recipients. CONCLUSION.: Although perioperative mortality was uncommon among elderly recipients (1.5%), a trend toward higher perioperative mortality was observed in recipients 80 years and older. There was no difference in survival among standard criteria donor and ECD recipients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)974-979
Number of pages6
JournalTransplantation
Volume90
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2010

Keywords

  • Elderly
  • Kidney transplant
  • Outcomes
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Transplantation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Intermediate-term outcomes associated with kidney transplantation in recipients 80 years and older: An analysis of the OPTN/UNOS database'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this