Interleukin-6 and risk of cognitive decline: Macarthur studies of successful aging

J. D. Weaver, M. H. Huang, Marilyn Albert, T. Harris, J. W. Rowe, T. E. Seeman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To investigate whether plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) is cross-sectionally related to poorer cognitive function and whether a baseline plasma IL-6 measurement can predict risk for decline in cognitive function in longitudinal follow-up of a population-based sample of nondisabled elderly people. Methods: A prospective cohort study of 779 high-functioning men and women aged 70 to 79 from the MacArthur Study of Successful Aging was conducted. Regression modeling was used to investigate whether baseline IL-6 levels (classified by tertiles) were associated with initial cognitive function and whether IL-6 levels predicted subsequent declines in cognitive function from 1988 to 1991 (2.5-year follow-up) and from 1988 to 1995 (7-year follow-up). Results: Subjects in the highest tertile for plasma IL-6 were marginally more likely to exhibit poorer baseline cognitive function (i.e., scores below the median), independent of demographic status, social status, health and health behaviors, and other physiologic variables (odds ratio [OR] = 1.46; 95% CI: 0.97, 2.20). At 2.5 years, those in both the second tertile of IL-6 (OR = 2.21; 95% CI: 1.44, 3.42) and the third tertile (OR = 2.03; 95% CI: 1.30, 3.19) were at increased risk of cognitive decline even after adjusting for all confounders. At 7 years of follow-up, only those in the highest IL-6 tertile were significantly more likely to exhibit declines in cognition (OR = 1.90; 95% CI: 1.14, 3.18) after adjustment for all confounders. Conclusions: The results suggest a relationship between elevated baseline plasma IL-6 and risk for subsequent decline in cognitive function. These findings are consistent with the hypothesized relationship between brain inflammation, as measured here by elevated plasma IL-6, and neuropathologic disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)371-378
Number of pages8
JournalNeurology
Volume59
Issue number3
StatePublished - Aug 13 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Interleukin-6
Cognition
Odds Ratio
Cognitive Dysfunction
Health Behavior
Encephalitis
Health Status
Cohort Studies
Demography
Prospective Studies
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Weaver, J. D., Huang, M. H., Albert, M., Harris, T., Rowe, J. W., & Seeman, T. E. (2002). Interleukin-6 and risk of cognitive decline: Macarthur studies of successful aging. Neurology, 59(3), 371-378.

Interleukin-6 and risk of cognitive decline : Macarthur studies of successful aging. / Weaver, J. D.; Huang, M. H.; Albert, Marilyn; Harris, T.; Rowe, J. W.; Seeman, T. E.

In: Neurology, Vol. 59, No. 3, 13.08.2002, p. 371-378.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weaver, JD, Huang, MH, Albert, M, Harris, T, Rowe, JW & Seeman, TE 2002, 'Interleukin-6 and risk of cognitive decline: Macarthur studies of successful aging', Neurology, vol. 59, no. 3, pp. 371-378.
Weaver JD, Huang MH, Albert M, Harris T, Rowe JW, Seeman TE. Interleukin-6 and risk of cognitive decline: Macarthur studies of successful aging. Neurology. 2002 Aug 13;59(3):371-378.
Weaver, J. D. ; Huang, M. H. ; Albert, Marilyn ; Harris, T. ; Rowe, J. W. ; Seeman, T. E. / Interleukin-6 and risk of cognitive decline : Macarthur studies of successful aging. In: Neurology. 2002 ; Vol. 59, No. 3. pp. 371-378.
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