Integrin receptors in renal tubular epithelium: New insights into pathophysiology of acute renal failure

M. S. Goligorsky, W. Lieberthal, L. Racusen, E. E. Simon

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

This review summarizes the existing evidence implicating disordered adhesion of renal tubular epithelial cells to the basement membrane in the pathophysiology of acute renal failure. The following three major lines of investigation are discussed: 1) exfoliation of renal tubular epithelial cells as a potential mechanism of tubular obstruction, 2) normal distribution of integrin receptors along the tubular apparatus, and 3) redistribution of integrin receptors and remodeling of the cytoskeleton following acute injury to renal tubular epithelium. We advance the hypothesis that the loss of the basolateral expression of integrin receptors is responsible for the exfoliation of viable proximal epithelial cells and that the redistribution of integrin receptors from the basolateral to the apical surface of epithelial cells facilitates adhesion of detached cells to the in situ cells. These two processes culminate in tubular obstruction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)F1-F8
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Renal Fluid and Electrolyte Physiology
Volume264
Issue number1 33-1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

Keywords

  • acute tubular necrosis
  • cell damage
  • cytoskeleton
  • focal adhesions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Integrin receptors in renal tubular epithelium: New insights into pathophysiology of acute renal failure'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this