Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education: Implementation Analysis

Dee Burton, Jennifer Trask, Irene Sandvold, Sania Amr, Sajida S. Chaudry, Marc Debay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In September 2012, the Health Resources and Services Administration funded 12 preventive medicine residency programs to participate in a 2-year project aimed at incorporating integrative medicine (IM) into their residency training programs. The grantees were asked to incorporate competencies for IM into their respective preventive medicine residency curricula and to provide for faculty development in IM. The analysis conducted in 2014-2015 used the following evidence to assess residency programs' achievements and challenges in implementation: progress and performance measures reports, curriculum mapping of program activities to IM competencies, records of webinar participation, and post-project individual semi-structured phone interviews with the 12 grantee project leaders. Key findings are: (1) IM activities offered to residents increased by 50% during the 2 years; (2) Accessing IM resources already in existence at local grantee sites was the primary facilitator of moving the integration of IM into preventive medicine residencies forward; (3) Among all activities offered residents, rotations were perceived by grantees as by far the most valuable contributor to acquiring IM competencies; (4) Online training was considered a greater contributor to preventive medicine residents' medical knowledge in IM than faculty lectures or courses; (5) Faculty were offered a rich variety of opportunities for professional development in IM, but some programs lacked a system to ensure faculty participation; and (6) Perceived lack of evidence for IM was a barrier to full program implementation at some sites. Grantees expect implemented programs to continue post-funding, but with decreased intensity owing to perceived faculty and curriculum time constraints.

LanguageEnglish (US)
PagesS241-S248
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume49
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

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Integrative Medicine
Preventive Medicine
Education
Internship and Residency
Curriculum
United States Health Resources and Services Administration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education : Implementation Analysis. / Burton, Dee; Trask, Jennifer; Sandvold, Irene; Amr, Sania; Chaudry, Sajida S.; Debay, Marc.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 49, No. 5, 01.11.2015, p. S241-S248.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Burton, Dee ; Trask, Jennifer ; Sandvold, Irene ; Amr, Sania ; Chaudry, Sajida S. ; Debay, Marc. / Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education : Implementation Analysis. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 49, No. 5. pp. S241-S248
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