Intake of whole grains, refined grains, and cereal fiber measured with 7-d diet records and associations with risk factors for chronic disease

P. K. Newby, Janice Maras, Peter Bakun, Denis Muller, Luigi Ferrucci, Katherine L. Tucker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Research studies examining foods are important, because they account for biological interactions that might otherwise be lost in the analysis of individual nutrients. Single-nutrient studies are also needed to explore the mechanisms by which foods may be protective. Objective: Our objective was to examine associations between whole grains, refined grains, and cereal fiber and chronic disease risk factors. Design: In a cross-sectional analysis of participants in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging, associations between dietary intakes and risk factors were examined with multivariate linear regression analysis. Dietary intakes were assessed with 7-d dietary records and quantified in g/d. Results: Compared with subjects in the lowest quintile (Q1) of whole-grain intake, subjects in the highest quintile (Q5) had lower body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2; Q1: 25.5; Q5: 24.8; P for trend

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1745-1753
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume86
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Diet records
  • Fiber
  • Refined grains
  • Risk factors
  • Whole grains

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

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