Insulin-like growth factor I receptors in the arteries of the rabbit: Autoradiographic mapping and receptor characterization

A. N. Sidawy, B. Termanini, R. V. Nardi, J. W. Harmon, L. Y. Korman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a polypeptide hormone structurally related to insulin with insulin-like metabolic effects. It is a potent mitogen, eliciting cell multiplication in tissue culture by increasing deoxyribonucleic acid and protein synthesis. IGF-I was found to promote the growth of cultured arterial smooth muscle cells. We studied the in situ distribution of IGF-I receptors in different arteries of the rabbit by autoradiography and examined their binding characteristics in the wall of the thoracic aorta. The thoracic and abdominal aortas and carotid, superior mesenteric, renal, and iliac arteries of three adult New Zealand rabbits were harvested and stored at -70°C. Autoradiographic analysis of 125I-labeled IGF-I binding to frozen arterial sections showed that silver-grain density was consistently located in the arterial wall. Binding studies in the thoracic aorta demonstrated high-affinity IGF-I receptors with a dissociation constant of 2 nmol/L and maximum IGF-I binding capacity of 4.17 pmol/mg protein. Inhibition studies with insulin, IGF-I, and IGF-II showed that these binding sites were more specific for IGF-I than for IGF-II or insulin, with a concentration of peptide that inhibits 50% of maximum binding of 1.75 nmol/L, 5 nmol/L, and >100 μmol/L, respectively. The presence of high-affinity, specific IGF-I receptor binding in rabbit arteries suggests that IGF-I plays an important role in regulating the multiplication of arterial smooth muscle cells; a role that may prove important in different pathologic processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)165-171
Number of pages7
JournalSurgery
Volume108
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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