Institutional long-term care

Rebecca D. Elon, Marshall B. Kapp

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Quality Nursing Home Care: Reform and Utopia: The American nursing facility is an important community resource, a refuge of last resort for those among us whose needs exceed the capacities of our families to provide care at home. Although often feared and reviled, the American nursing home is a dynamic microcosm, a subculture within the broader community. Nursing homes reflect the values of the communities of which they are a part. The call for “culture change” within the nursing home is really a call for an examination and evolution of the parent culture that created the nursing home in the first place. If the nursing home neglects its residents, the blame in part may be placed at the feet of the community. Although a corporation may own the nursing home, it belongs to the community in a moral sense. In America today, however, we are more apt to adopt a highway than a nursing home or the nursing home resident without any family of her own. The best nursing homes are likely to be those staffed by local men and women who take pride in their work and are respected for helping their neighbors care for family members who are infirm and disabled. They are likely to be those facilities in which: families, including children, remain actively involved in the lives of their loved ones entrusted into institutional care; organizations such as faith communities, schools, and clubs are routinely present to enrich and enhance the quality of life for the residents; and frail older people can remain spiritually alive and engaged in relationships, celebrations, and community life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationReichel's Care of the Elderly: Clinical Aspects of Aging, Sixth Edition
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages466-475
Number of pages10
ISBN (Print)9780511575952, 9780521869294
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

Fingerprint

Long-Term Care
Nursing Homes
Home Care Services
Utopias
Home Nursing
Nursing Care
Foot
Nursing
Quality of Life
Organizations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Elon, R. D., & Kapp, M. B. (2009). Institutional long-term care. In Reichel's Care of the Elderly: Clinical Aspects of Aging, Sixth Edition (pp. 466-475). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511575952.044

Institutional long-term care. / Elon, Rebecca D.; Kapp, Marshall B.

Reichel's Care of the Elderly: Clinical Aspects of Aging, Sixth Edition. Cambridge University Press, 2009. p. 466-475.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Elon, RD & Kapp, MB 2009, Institutional long-term care. in Reichel's Care of the Elderly: Clinical Aspects of Aging, Sixth Edition. Cambridge University Press, pp. 466-475. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511575952.044
Elon RD, Kapp MB. Institutional long-term care. In Reichel's Care of the Elderly: Clinical Aspects of Aging, Sixth Edition. Cambridge University Press. 2009. p. 466-475 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511575952.044
Elon, Rebecca D. ; Kapp, Marshall B. / Institutional long-term care. Reichel's Care of the Elderly: Clinical Aspects of Aging, Sixth Edition. Cambridge University Press, 2009. pp. 466-475
@inbook{1981a19f28a34915853f6b3f4583ee40,
title = "Institutional long-term care",
abstract = "Quality Nursing Home Care: Reform and Utopia: The American nursing facility is an important community resource, a refuge of last resort for those among us whose needs exceed the capacities of our families to provide care at home. Although often feared and reviled, the American nursing home is a dynamic microcosm, a subculture within the broader community. Nursing homes reflect the values of the communities of which they are a part. The call for “culture change” within the nursing home is really a call for an examination and evolution of the parent culture that created the nursing home in the first place. If the nursing home neglects its residents, the blame in part may be placed at the feet of the community. Although a corporation may own the nursing home, it belongs to the community in a moral sense. In America today, however, we are more apt to adopt a highway than a nursing home or the nursing home resident without any family of her own. The best nursing homes are likely to be those staffed by local men and women who take pride in their work and are respected for helping their neighbors care for family members who are infirm and disabled. They are likely to be those facilities in which: families, including children, remain actively involved in the lives of their loved ones entrusted into institutional care; organizations such as faith communities, schools, and clubs are routinely present to enrich and enhance the quality of life for the residents; and frail older people can remain spiritually alive and engaged in relationships, celebrations, and community life.",
author = "Elon, {Rebecca D.} and Kapp, {Marshall B.}",
year = "2009",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/CBO9780511575952.044",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9780511575952",
pages = "466--475",
booktitle = "Reichel's Care of the Elderly: Clinical Aspects of Aging, Sixth Edition",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Institutional long-term care

AU - Elon, Rebecca D.

AU - Kapp, Marshall B.

PY - 2009/1/1

Y1 - 2009/1/1

N2 - Quality Nursing Home Care: Reform and Utopia: The American nursing facility is an important community resource, a refuge of last resort for those among us whose needs exceed the capacities of our families to provide care at home. Although often feared and reviled, the American nursing home is a dynamic microcosm, a subculture within the broader community. Nursing homes reflect the values of the communities of which they are a part. The call for “culture change” within the nursing home is really a call for an examination and evolution of the parent culture that created the nursing home in the first place. If the nursing home neglects its residents, the blame in part may be placed at the feet of the community. Although a corporation may own the nursing home, it belongs to the community in a moral sense. In America today, however, we are more apt to adopt a highway than a nursing home or the nursing home resident without any family of her own. The best nursing homes are likely to be those staffed by local men and women who take pride in their work and are respected for helping their neighbors care for family members who are infirm and disabled. They are likely to be those facilities in which: families, including children, remain actively involved in the lives of their loved ones entrusted into institutional care; organizations such as faith communities, schools, and clubs are routinely present to enrich and enhance the quality of life for the residents; and frail older people can remain spiritually alive and engaged in relationships, celebrations, and community life.

AB - Quality Nursing Home Care: Reform and Utopia: The American nursing facility is an important community resource, a refuge of last resort for those among us whose needs exceed the capacities of our families to provide care at home. Although often feared and reviled, the American nursing home is a dynamic microcosm, a subculture within the broader community. Nursing homes reflect the values of the communities of which they are a part. The call for “culture change” within the nursing home is really a call for an examination and evolution of the parent culture that created the nursing home in the first place. If the nursing home neglects its residents, the blame in part may be placed at the feet of the community. Although a corporation may own the nursing home, it belongs to the community in a moral sense. In America today, however, we are more apt to adopt a highway than a nursing home or the nursing home resident without any family of her own. The best nursing homes are likely to be those staffed by local men and women who take pride in their work and are respected for helping their neighbors care for family members who are infirm and disabled. They are likely to be those facilities in which: families, including children, remain actively involved in the lives of their loved ones entrusted into institutional care; organizations such as faith communities, schools, and clubs are routinely present to enrich and enhance the quality of life for the residents; and frail older people can remain spiritually alive and engaged in relationships, celebrations, and community life.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84932620194&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84932620194&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/CBO9780511575952.044

DO - 10.1017/CBO9780511575952.044

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:84932620194

SN - 9780511575952

SN - 9780521869294

SP - 466

EP - 475

BT - Reichel's Care of the Elderly: Clinical Aspects of Aging, Sixth Edition

PB - Cambridge University Press

ER -