Insomnia as a predictor of job exit among middle-aged and older adults: Results from the Health and Retirement Study

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Abstract

Objectives Poor health is a recognised predictor of workforce exit, but little is known about the role of insomnia in workforce exit. We examined the association between insomnia symptoms and subsequent job exit among middle-aged and older adults from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). Methods The study sample consisted of 5746 respondents aged between 50 and 70 who were working for pay when interviewed in the HRS 2004 and were followed up in the HRS 2006. Multinomial logistic regression was used to determine the association between number of insomnia symptoms (0, 1-2, 3-4) and job exit (no exit, health-related exit or exit due to other reasons). Results In models adjusting for demographic characteristics, baseline health status and baseline job characteristics, compared with respondents with no insomnia symptoms, those with 3-4 insomnia symptoms had approximately twice the odds of leaving the workforce due to poor health (adjusted relative risk ratio=1.93, 95% CI 1.04 to 3.58, p=0.036). There was no association between insomnia and job exit due to non-health reasons. Conclusions An elevated number of insomnia symptoms is independently associated with leaving paid employment. Workplace screening for and treatment of insomnia symptoms may prolong labour force participation of middle-aged and older adults.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages750-757
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Volume71
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

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Retirement
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Health
Workplace
Health Status
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Demography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Insomnia as a predictor of job exit among middle-aged and older adults: Results from the Health and Retirement Study",
abstract = "Objectives Poor health is a recognised predictor of workforce exit, but little is known about the role of insomnia in workforce exit. We examined the association between insomnia symptoms and subsequent job exit among middle-aged and older adults from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). Methods The study sample consisted of 5746 respondents aged between 50 and 70 who were working for pay when interviewed in the HRS 2004 and were followed up in the HRS 2006. Multinomial logistic regression was used to determine the association between number of insomnia symptoms (0, 1-2, 3-4) and job exit (no exit, health-related exit or exit due to other reasons). Results In models adjusting for demographic characteristics, baseline health status and baseline job characteristics, compared with respondents with no insomnia symptoms, those with 3-4 insomnia symptoms had approximately twice the odds of leaving the workforce due to poor health (adjusted relative risk ratio=1.93, 95{\%} CI 1.04 to 3.58, p=0.036). There was no association between insomnia and job exit due to non-health reasons. Conclusions An elevated number of insomnia symptoms is independently associated with leaving paid employment. Workplace screening for and treatment of insomnia symptoms may prolong labour force participation of middle-aged and older adults.",
author = "Liming Dong and Jacqueline Agnew and Ramin Mojtabai and Surkan, {Pamela J.} and Spira, {Adam P.}",
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N2 - Objectives Poor health is a recognised predictor of workforce exit, but little is known about the role of insomnia in workforce exit. We examined the association between insomnia symptoms and subsequent job exit among middle-aged and older adults from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). Methods The study sample consisted of 5746 respondents aged between 50 and 70 who were working for pay when interviewed in the HRS 2004 and were followed up in the HRS 2006. Multinomial logistic regression was used to determine the association between number of insomnia symptoms (0, 1-2, 3-4) and job exit (no exit, health-related exit or exit due to other reasons). Results In models adjusting for demographic characteristics, baseline health status and baseline job characteristics, compared with respondents with no insomnia symptoms, those with 3-4 insomnia symptoms had approximately twice the odds of leaving the workforce due to poor health (adjusted relative risk ratio=1.93, 95% CI 1.04 to 3.58, p=0.036). There was no association between insomnia and job exit due to non-health reasons. Conclusions An elevated number of insomnia symptoms is independently associated with leaving paid employment. Workplace screening for and treatment of insomnia symptoms may prolong labour force participation of middle-aged and older adults.

AB - Objectives Poor health is a recognised predictor of workforce exit, but little is known about the role of insomnia in workforce exit. We examined the association between insomnia symptoms and subsequent job exit among middle-aged and older adults from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). Methods The study sample consisted of 5746 respondents aged between 50 and 70 who were working for pay when interviewed in the HRS 2004 and were followed up in the HRS 2006. Multinomial logistic regression was used to determine the association between number of insomnia symptoms (0, 1-2, 3-4) and job exit (no exit, health-related exit or exit due to other reasons). Results In models adjusting for demographic characteristics, baseline health status and baseline job characteristics, compared with respondents with no insomnia symptoms, those with 3-4 insomnia symptoms had approximately twice the odds of leaving the workforce due to poor health (adjusted relative risk ratio=1.93, 95% CI 1.04 to 3.58, p=0.036). There was no association between insomnia and job exit due to non-health reasons. Conclusions An elevated number of insomnia symptoms is independently associated with leaving paid employment. Workplace screening for and treatment of insomnia symptoms may prolong labour force participation of middle-aged and older adults.

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