Insect sting allergy in children: What is the real cost of the disease?

Angela D. Mickalide, Martin D. Valentine, Margaret R. Dear, Kenneth C Schuberth, Kathleen A. Kwiterovich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The impact of insect sting allergies on the quality of life of 118 children and their parents is assessed using attitudinal and psychometric questionnaires. Children, ranging in age from 7-15 years, manifested more anxiety in the clinical setting (state anxiety) than usual (trait anxiety), whereas for parents the trend was reversed. Most children believed that they could control being stung, and restrictions imposed by two-thirds of the parents assisted in preventing stinging episodes. Parents perceived their child's academic achievement, social abilities and extracurricular involvement as superior to that of their peers and closest aged siblings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-209
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Archives of Allergy and Immunology
Volume77
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1985

Fingerprint

Insect Bites and Stings
Cost of Illness
Hypersensitivity
Parents
Anxiety
Psychometrics
Siblings
Quality of Life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Insect sting allergy in children : What is the real cost of the disease? / Mickalide, Angela D.; Valentine, Martin D.; Dear, Margaret R.; Schuberth, Kenneth C; Kwiterovich, Kathleen A.

In: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, Vol. 77, No. 1-2, 1985, p. 206-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mickalide, Angela D. ; Valentine, Martin D. ; Dear, Margaret R. ; Schuberth, Kenneth C ; Kwiterovich, Kathleen A. / Insect sting allergy in children : What is the real cost of the disease?. In: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology. 1985 ; Vol. 77, No. 1-2. pp. 206-209.
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