Inositol trisphosphate 3-kinases: Focus on immune and neuronal signaling

Michael J. Schell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The localized control of second messenger levels sculpts dynamic and persistent changes in cell physiology and structure. Inositol trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P 3] 3-kinases (ITPKs) phosphorylate the intracellular second messenger Ins(1,4,5)P 3. These enzymes terminate the signal to release Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum and produce the messenger inositol tetrakisphosphate [Ins(1,3,4,5)P 4]. Independent of their enzymatic activity, ITPKs regulate the microstructure of the actin cytoskeleton. The immune phenotypes of ITPK knockout mice raise new questions about how ITPKs control inositol phosphate lifetimes within spatial and temporal domains during lymphocyte maturation. The intense concentration of ITPK on actin inside the dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons suggests a role in signal integration and structural plasticity in the dendrite, and mice lacking neuronal ITPK exhibit memory deficits. Thus, the molecular and anatomical features of ITPKs allow them to regulate the spatiotemporal properties of intracellular signals, leading to the formation of persistent molecular memories.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1755-1778
Number of pages24
JournalCellular and Molecular Life Sciences
Volume67
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Second Messenger Systems
Inositol
Phosphotransferases
Cell Physiological Phenomena
Dendritic Spines
Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate
Inositol Phosphates
Pyramidal Cells
Memory Disorders
Dendrites
Actin Cytoskeleton
Knockout Mice
Endoplasmic Reticulum
Actins
Lymphocytes
Phenotype
Enzymes
inositol-1,3,4,5-tetrakisphosphate

Keywords

  • Dendritic spines
  • F-actin
  • Inositol phosphates
  • Integration
  • Intracellular Ca
  • Lymphocyte
  • Neutrophil
  • Pyramidal neuron
  • Rho GTPase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Inositol trisphosphate 3-kinases : Focus on immune and neuronal signaling. / Schell, Michael J.

In: Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, Vol. 67, No. 11, 06.2010, p. 1755-1778.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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