Inner ear anomalies in children with isolated unilateral congenital aural atresia

Tyler R. Halle, Bruno Soares, N. Wendell Todd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis We aim to define the frequencies of anomalies of the inner ear, oval window, and round window ipsilateral to isolated non-syndromic unilateral aural atresia. Methods and materials Retrospective case series. We reviewed high resolution computed tomography scans of the temporal bones of 70 children with isolated non-syndromic unilateral congenital aural atresia. Scans were reviewed according to the Jahrsdoerfer criteria and further evaluated for anomalies of the vestibule, semi-circular canals, cochlea, internal auditory canal and vestibulocochlear nerve. Results Inner ear dysplasia was seen in two of 70 atretic ears: one with a dysmorphic lateral semicircular canal and another with a large vestibule assimilating the lateral semicircular canal. Abnormalities of the oval window and round window ipsilateral to the atresia were identified in 21% (15) and 7% (5), respectively, of the atretic ears. Oval window and round window abnormalities were associated with disproportionately lower Jahrsdoerfer scores compared to aural atresia patients without these abnormalities (P < 0.001 and P = 0.04, respectively). Conclusion Compared to studies that included syndromic or bilateral atresia cases, we found inner ear and oval window abnormalities less common in children with isolated non-syndromic unilateral aural atresia. However, round window anomalies seem to occur at about the same frequency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-8
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Volume95
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Keywords

  • Aural atresia
  • Inner ear
  • Oval window
  • Round window

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Otorhinolaryngology

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