Innate Immunity of cultured skin substitutes: Cytokines stimulate anti-microbial activity

Gulsun Erdag, Jeffrey R. Morgan

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

The possibility that the natural antimicrobial properties of the cultured cells could be upregulated prior to transplantation was investigated. The main aim was to determine if cultured skin substitutes could be better prepared for abrupt transition from an aseptic environment to a contaminated wound site. The studies identified anti-microbial peptides that are made by epithelial cells including keratinocytes and these peptides are thought to be one component of innate immunity. The results suggest that it may be possible to enhance the innate immunity of cultured skin substitutes to better prepare them for survival in contaminated wounds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000
EventSecond Smith and Nephew International Symposium - Tissue Engineering 2000: Advances in Tissue Engineering, Biomaterials and Cell Signalling - York, United Kingdom
Duration: Jul 16 2000Jul 19 2000

Other

OtherSecond Smith and Nephew International Symposium - Tissue Engineering 2000: Advances in Tissue Engineering, Biomaterials and Cell Signalling
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityYork
Period7/16/007/19/00

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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