Inmate-made weapons in prison facilities: Assessing the injury risk

J. M. Lincoln, L. H. Chen, J. S. Mair, P. J. Biermann, S. P. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

More than 2400 correctional workers in the United States required medical attention in 1999 following assaults by inmates, often with unconventional "homemade" weapons. Little information is available about these weapons. The authors surveyed 101 state prisons for a 12 month period within 2002-03, and 70 responded. A total of 1326 weapons were either confiscated (1086) or used to injure inmates (203) or staff (37). Staff were most often attacked with clubs. The prison store was the most common source of materials used to make confiscated weapons. Issued items were the most common source of materials used to make weapons to injure staff. The injury rate for staff was 1.0/1000 workers per year. The annual cost of injuries for time lost and medical care for staff was estimated at $1,125,000 in these 70 prisons. Results identify materials that should be redesigned to prevent modifications to make weapons. Prison stores and issued items deserve special attention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)195-198
Number of pages4
JournalInjury Prevention
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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