Injury enhances TLR2 function and antimicrobial peptide expression through a vitamin D-dependent mechanism

Jürgen Schauber, Robert A. Dorschner, Alvin B. Coda, Amanda S. Büchau, Philip T. Liu, David Kiken, Yolanda R. Helfrich, Sewon Kang, Hashem Z. Elalieh, Andreas Steinmeyer, Ulrich Zügel, Daniel D. Bikle, Robert L. Modlin, Richard L. Gallo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

An essential element of the innate immune response to injury is the capacity to recognize microbial invasion and stimulate production of antimicrobial peptides. We investigated how this process is controlled in the epidermis. Keratinocytes surrounding a wound increased expression of the genes coding for the microbial pattern recognition receptors CD14 and TLR2, complementing an increase in cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide expression. These genes were induced by 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D3 (1,25D3; its active form), suggesting a role for vitamin D3 in this process. How 1,25D3 could participate in the injury response was explained by findings that the levels of CYP27B1, which converts 25OH vitamin D3 (25D3) to active 1,25D3, were increased in wounds and induced in keratinocytes in response to TGF-β1. Blocking the vitamin D receptor, inhibiting CYP27B1, or limiting 25D3 availability prevented TGF-β1 from inducing cathelicidin, CD14, or TLR2 in human keratinocytes, while CYP27B1-deficient mice failed to increase CD14 expression following wounding. The functional consequence of these observations was confirmed by demonstrating that 1,25D3 enabled keratinocytes to recognize microbial components through TLR2 and respond by cathelicidin production. Thus, we demonstrate what we believe to be a previously unexpected role for vitamin D3 in innate immunity, enabling keratinocytes to recognize and respond to microbes and to protect wounds against infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)803-811
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume117
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Cholecalciferol
Vitamin D
Peptides
Keratinocytes
Wounds and Injuries
25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 1-alpha-Hydroxylase
Innate Immunity
Microbial Genes
Pattern Recognition Receptors
Calcitriol Receptors
Wound Infection
Epidermis
Gene Expression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Schauber, J., Dorschner, R. A., Coda, A. B., Büchau, A. S., Liu, P. T., Kiken, D., ... Gallo, R. L. (2007). Injury enhances TLR2 function and antimicrobial peptide expression through a vitamin D-dependent mechanism. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 117(3), 803-811. https://doi.org/10.1172/JCI30142

Injury enhances TLR2 function and antimicrobial peptide expression through a vitamin D-dependent mechanism. / Schauber, Jürgen; Dorschner, Robert A.; Coda, Alvin B.; Büchau, Amanda S.; Liu, Philip T.; Kiken, David; Helfrich, Yolanda R.; Kang, Sewon; Elalieh, Hashem Z.; Steinmeyer, Andreas; Zügel, Ulrich; Bikle, Daniel D.; Modlin, Robert L.; Gallo, Richard L.

In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, Vol. 117, No. 3, 01.03.2007, p. 803-811.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schauber, J, Dorschner, RA, Coda, AB, Büchau, AS, Liu, PT, Kiken, D, Helfrich, YR, Kang, S, Elalieh, HZ, Steinmeyer, A, Zügel, U, Bikle, DD, Modlin, RL & Gallo, RL 2007, 'Injury enhances TLR2 function and antimicrobial peptide expression through a vitamin D-dependent mechanism', Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 117, no. 3, pp. 803-811. https://doi.org/10.1172/JCI30142
Schauber, Jürgen ; Dorschner, Robert A. ; Coda, Alvin B. ; Büchau, Amanda S. ; Liu, Philip T. ; Kiken, David ; Helfrich, Yolanda R. ; Kang, Sewon ; Elalieh, Hashem Z. ; Steinmeyer, Andreas ; Zügel, Ulrich ; Bikle, Daniel D. ; Modlin, Robert L. ; Gallo, Richard L. / Injury enhances TLR2 function and antimicrobial peptide expression through a vitamin D-dependent mechanism. In: Journal of Clinical Investigation. 2007 ; Vol. 117, No. 3. pp. 803-811.
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AU - Kiken, David

AU - Helfrich, Yolanda R.

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