Injection drug use is an independent risk factor for iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among HIV-seropositive and HIV-seronegative women

Barbara Dancheck, Alice M. Tang, Ann M. Thomas, Ellen Smit, David Vlahov, Richard D. Semba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The risk factors for iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among female injection drug users are not well characterized. We measured hemoglobin and plasma ferritin and obtained demographic information and injection drug use history in the last 6 months in a cross-sectional study of 200 female injection drug users (134 HIV-positive and 66 HIV-negative). The women were participants in a natural history study, the AIDS Linked to Intravenous Experiences study in Baltimore, Maryland. In multivariate analyses adjusting for age, hepatitis C virus status, and HIV status, injection drug use within the last 6 months was associated with iron deficiency (odds ratio [OR] = 2.61, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.33 to 5.09) and iron deficiency anemia (OR = 6.65, 95% CI: 2.33 to 18.9). Among 134 HIV-positive women, injection drug use in the last 6 months was associated with iron deficiency (OR = 2.43, 95% CI: 1.08 to 5.48) and iron deficiency anemia (OR = 6.05, 95% CI: 1.82 to 20.1) in multivariate analyses adjusting for hepatitis C virus status and CD4+ lymphocyte count. Injection drug use seems to be associated with iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia. Furthzer longitudinal studies are needed to gain insight into the nature of this association.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)198-201
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of acquired immune deficiency syndromes
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2005

Keywords

  • Anemia
  • HIV
  • Injection drug use
  • Iron deficiency
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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