Inhibition of spontaneous metastasis in a rat prostate cancer model by oral administration of modified citrus pectin

Kenneth Pienta, Harmesh Nailk, Adil Akhtar, Kosuke Yamazaki, Tracy S. Replogle, Jeffrey Lehr, Terry L. Donat, Larry Tait, Victor Hogan, Avraham Raz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in U.S. men and remains incurable once it has metastasized. Many stages of the metastatic cascade involve cellular interactions mediated by cell surface components, such as carbohydrate-binding proteins, including galactoside-binding lectins (galectins). Modified citrus pectin (pH-modified), a soluble component of plant fiber derived form citrus fruit, has been shown to interfere with cell-cell interactions mediated by cell surface carbohydrate-binding galectin-3 molecules. Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether modified citrus pectin, a complex polysaccharide rich in galactosyl residues, could inhibit spontaneous metastasis of prostate adenocarcinoma cells in the rat. Methods: The ability of modified citrus pectin to inhibit the adhesion of Dunning rat prostate cancer MAT-LyLu cells to rat endothelial cells was measured by 51Cr-labeling. Modified citrus pectin inhibition of MAT-LyLu cell anchorage-independent growth was measured by colony formation in agarose. The presence of galectin-3 in rat MAT-LyLu cells and human prostate carcinoma was demonstrated by immunoblotting and immunohisto-chemistry. One million MAT-LyLu cells were injected sub-cutaneously into the hind limb of male Copenhagen rats on day 0. Rats were given 0.0%, 0.01%, 0.1%, or 1.0% (wt/vol) modified citrus pectin continuously in their drinking water (from day 4 until necropsy on day 30). The number of MAT-LyLu tumor colonies in the lungs were counted. Results: Compared with15 of 16 control rats that had lung metastases on day 30, seven of 14 rats in the 0.1% and nine of 16 rats in the 1.0% modified citrus-pectin group had statistically significant (two-sided; P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)348-353
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the National Cancer Institute
Volume87
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Prostate Cancer
Metastasis
Mouth Neoplasms
Oral Administration
Rats
Prostatic Neoplasms
Neoplasm Metastasis
Cell
Lectin
Galactosides
Lectins
Carbohydrates
Model
Lung
Citrus fruits
Prostate
Rat control
Immunohistochemistry
Plant Structures
citrus pectin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Statistics, Probability and Uncertainty
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Inhibition of spontaneous metastasis in a rat prostate cancer model by oral administration of modified citrus pectin. / Pienta, Kenneth; Nailk, Harmesh; Akhtar, Adil; Yamazaki, Kosuke; Replogle, Tracy S.; Lehr, Jeffrey; Donat, Terry L.; Tait, Larry; Hogan, Victor; Raz, Avraham.

In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Vol. 87, No. 5, 01.03.1995, p. 348-353.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pienta, K, Nailk, H, Akhtar, A, Yamazaki, K, Replogle, TS, Lehr, J, Donat, TL, Tait, L, Hogan, V & Raz, A 1995, 'Inhibition of spontaneous metastasis in a rat prostate cancer model by oral administration of modified citrus pectin', Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 87, no. 5, pp. 348-353. https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/87.5.348
Pienta, Kenneth ; Nailk, Harmesh ; Akhtar, Adil ; Yamazaki, Kosuke ; Replogle, Tracy S. ; Lehr, Jeffrey ; Donat, Terry L. ; Tait, Larry ; Hogan, Victor ; Raz, Avraham. / Inhibition of spontaneous metastasis in a rat prostate cancer model by oral administration of modified citrus pectin. In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 1995 ; Vol. 87, No. 5. pp. 348-353.
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abstract = "Background: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in U.S. men and remains incurable once it has metastasized. Many stages of the metastatic cascade involve cellular interactions mediated by cell surface components, such as carbohydrate-binding proteins, including galactoside-binding lectins (galectins). Modified citrus pectin (pH-modified), a soluble component of plant fiber derived form citrus fruit, has been shown to interfere with cell-cell interactions mediated by cell surface carbohydrate-binding galectin-3 molecules. Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether modified citrus pectin, a complex polysaccharide rich in galactosyl residues, could inhibit spontaneous metastasis of prostate adenocarcinoma cells in the rat. Methods: The ability of modified citrus pectin to inhibit the adhesion of Dunning rat prostate cancer MAT-LyLu cells to rat endothelial cells was measured by 51Cr-labeling. Modified citrus pectin inhibition of MAT-LyLu cell anchorage-independent growth was measured by colony formation in agarose. The presence of galectin-3 in rat MAT-LyLu cells and human prostate carcinoma was demonstrated by immunoblotting and immunohisto-chemistry. One million MAT-LyLu cells were injected sub-cutaneously into the hind limb of male Copenhagen rats on day 0. Rats were given 0.0{\%}, 0.01{\%}, 0.1{\%}, or 1.0{\%} (wt/vol) modified citrus pectin continuously in their drinking water (from day 4 until necropsy on day 30). The number of MAT-LyLu tumor colonies in the lungs were counted. Results: Compared with15 of 16 control rats that had lung metastases on day 30, seven of 14 rats in the 0.1{\%} and nine of 16 rats in the 1.0{\%} modified citrus-pectin group had statistically significant (two-sided; P",
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AU - Nailk, Harmesh

AU - Akhtar, Adil

AU - Yamazaki, Kosuke

AU - Replogle, Tracy S.

AU - Lehr, Jeffrey

AU - Donat, Terry L.

AU - Tait, Larry

AU - Hogan, Victor

AU - Raz, Avraham

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N2 - Background: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in U.S. men and remains incurable once it has metastasized. Many stages of the metastatic cascade involve cellular interactions mediated by cell surface components, such as carbohydrate-binding proteins, including galactoside-binding lectins (galectins). Modified citrus pectin (pH-modified), a soluble component of plant fiber derived form citrus fruit, has been shown to interfere with cell-cell interactions mediated by cell surface carbohydrate-binding galectin-3 molecules. Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether modified citrus pectin, a complex polysaccharide rich in galactosyl residues, could inhibit spontaneous metastasis of prostate adenocarcinoma cells in the rat. Methods: The ability of modified citrus pectin to inhibit the adhesion of Dunning rat prostate cancer MAT-LyLu cells to rat endothelial cells was measured by 51Cr-labeling. Modified citrus pectin inhibition of MAT-LyLu cell anchorage-independent growth was measured by colony formation in agarose. The presence of galectin-3 in rat MAT-LyLu cells and human prostate carcinoma was demonstrated by immunoblotting and immunohisto-chemistry. One million MAT-LyLu cells were injected sub-cutaneously into the hind limb of male Copenhagen rats on day 0. Rats were given 0.0%, 0.01%, 0.1%, or 1.0% (wt/vol) modified citrus pectin continuously in their drinking water (from day 4 until necropsy on day 30). The number of MAT-LyLu tumor colonies in the lungs were counted. Results: Compared with15 of 16 control rats that had lung metastases on day 30, seven of 14 rats in the 0.1% and nine of 16 rats in the 1.0% modified citrus-pectin group had statistically significant (two-sided; P

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