Inhibition of microglial activation contributes to propofol-induced protection against post-cardiac arrest brain injury in rats

Wei Wang, Rui Lu, Da Yun Feng, Li Rong Liang, Bing Liu, Hui Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

It has been suggested that propofol can modulate microglial activity and hence may have potential roles against neuroinflammation following brain ischemic insult. However, whether and how propofol can inhibit post-cardiac arrest brain injury via inhibition of microglia activation remains unclear. A rat model of asphyxia cardiac arrest (CA) was created followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation. CA induced marked microglial activation in the hippocampal CA1 region, revealed by increased OX42 and P2 class of purinoceptor 7 (P2X7R) expression, as well as p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Morris water maze showed that learning and memory deficits following CA could be inhibited or alleviated by pre-treatment with the microglial inhibitor minocycline or propofol. Microglial activation was significantly suppressed likely via the P2X7R/p-p38 pathway by propofol. Moreover, hippocampal neuronal injuries after CA were remarkably attenuated by propofol. In vitro experiment showed that propofol pre-treatment inhibited ATP-induced microglial activation and release of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. In addition, propofol protected neurons from injury when co-culturing with ATP-treated microglia. Our data suggest that propofol pre-treatment inhibits CA-induced microglial activation and neuronal injury in the hippocampus and ultimately improves cognitive function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)892-902
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neurochemistry
Volume134
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Keywords

  • cardiac arrest
  • cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • hippocampus
  • microglia
  • propofol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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