Inhibition of ghrelin O-acyltransferase attenuates food deprivation-induced increases in ingestive behavior

Brett J W Teubner, John T. Garretson, You Sang Hwang, Philip A. Cole, Timothy J. Bartness

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach in direct proportion to the time since the last meal and has therefore been called a 'hunger signal'. The octanoylation of ghrelin is critical for its orexigenic functions and is dependent upon ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) catalyzation. The GOAT inhibitor, GO-CoA-Tat, decreases the circulating concentrations of octanoylated ghrelin and attenuates weight gain on a high fat diet in mice. Unlike rats and mice, Siberian hamsters and humans do not increase food intake after food deprivation, but increase food hoarding after food deprivation. In Siberian hamsters, exogenous ghrelin increases ingestive behaviors similarly to 48-56. h food deprivation. Therefore, we tested the necessity of increased ghrelin in food-deprived Siberian hamsters to stimulate ingestive behaviors. To do so we used our simulated natural housing system that allows hamsters to forage for and hoard food. Animals were given an injection of GO-CoA-Tat (i.p., 11 μmol/kg) every 6. h because that is the duration of its effective inhibition of octanoylated ghrelin concentrations during a 48. h food deprivation. We found that GO-CoA-Tat attenuated food foraging (0-1. h), food intake (0-1 and 2-4. h), and food hoarding (0-1. h and 2 and 3. days) post-refeeding compared with saline treated animals. This suggests that increased octanoylated ghrelin concentrations play a role in the food deprivation-induced increases in ingestive behavior. Therefore, ghrelin is a critical aspect of the multi-faceted mechanisms that stimulate ingestive behaviors, and might be a critical point for a successful clinical intervention scheme in humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)667-673
Number of pages7
JournalHormones and Behavior
Volume63
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2013

Fingerprint

Acyltransferases
Food Deprivation
Ghrelin
Phodopus
Food
Eating
Inhibition (Psychology)
Hunger
High Fat Diet
Cricetinae
Weight Gain
Meals
Stomach
Hormones

Keywords

  • Body mass
  • Food intake
  • Foraging
  • Hoarding
  • Siberian hamster

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems

Cite this

Inhibition of ghrelin O-acyltransferase attenuates food deprivation-induced increases in ingestive behavior. / Teubner, Brett J W; Garretson, John T.; Hwang, You Sang; Cole, Philip A.; Bartness, Timothy J.

In: Hormones and Behavior, Vol. 63, No. 4, 04.2013, p. 667-673.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Teubner, Brett J W ; Garretson, John T. ; Hwang, You Sang ; Cole, Philip A. ; Bartness, Timothy J. / Inhibition of ghrelin O-acyltransferase attenuates food deprivation-induced increases in ingestive behavior. In: Hormones and Behavior. 2013 ; Vol. 63, No. 4. pp. 667-673.
@article{af70eca834264b739d9fd553978821c0,
title = "Inhibition of ghrelin O-acyltransferase attenuates food deprivation-induced increases in ingestive behavior",
abstract = "Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach in direct proportion to the time since the last meal and has therefore been called a 'hunger signal'. The octanoylation of ghrelin is critical for its orexigenic functions and is dependent upon ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) catalyzation. The GOAT inhibitor, GO-CoA-Tat, decreases the circulating concentrations of octanoylated ghrelin and attenuates weight gain on a high fat diet in mice. Unlike rats and mice, Siberian hamsters and humans do not increase food intake after food deprivation, but increase food hoarding after food deprivation. In Siberian hamsters, exogenous ghrelin increases ingestive behaviors similarly to 48-56. h food deprivation. Therefore, we tested the necessity of increased ghrelin in food-deprived Siberian hamsters to stimulate ingestive behaviors. To do so we used our simulated natural housing system that allows hamsters to forage for and hoard food. Animals were given an injection of GO-CoA-Tat (i.p., 11 μmol/kg) every 6. h because that is the duration of its effective inhibition of octanoylated ghrelin concentrations during a 48. h food deprivation. We found that GO-CoA-Tat attenuated food foraging (0-1. h), food intake (0-1 and 2-4. h), and food hoarding (0-1. h and 2 and 3. days) post-refeeding compared with saline treated animals. This suggests that increased octanoylated ghrelin concentrations play a role in the food deprivation-induced increases in ingestive behavior. Therefore, ghrelin is a critical aspect of the multi-faceted mechanisms that stimulate ingestive behaviors, and might be a critical point for a successful clinical intervention scheme in humans.",
keywords = "Body mass, Food intake, Foraging, Hoarding, Siberian hamster",
author = "Teubner, {Brett J W} and Garretson, {John T.} and Hwang, {You Sang} and Cole, {Philip A.} and Bartness, {Timothy J.}",
year = "2013",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1016/j.yhbeh.2013.02.001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "63",
pages = "667--673",
journal = "Hormones and Behavior",
issn = "0018-506X",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Inhibition of ghrelin O-acyltransferase attenuates food deprivation-induced increases in ingestive behavior

AU - Teubner, Brett J W

AU - Garretson, John T.

AU - Hwang, You Sang

AU - Cole, Philip A.

AU - Bartness, Timothy J.

PY - 2013/4

Y1 - 2013/4

N2 - Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach in direct proportion to the time since the last meal and has therefore been called a 'hunger signal'. The octanoylation of ghrelin is critical for its orexigenic functions and is dependent upon ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) catalyzation. The GOAT inhibitor, GO-CoA-Tat, decreases the circulating concentrations of octanoylated ghrelin and attenuates weight gain on a high fat diet in mice. Unlike rats and mice, Siberian hamsters and humans do not increase food intake after food deprivation, but increase food hoarding after food deprivation. In Siberian hamsters, exogenous ghrelin increases ingestive behaviors similarly to 48-56. h food deprivation. Therefore, we tested the necessity of increased ghrelin in food-deprived Siberian hamsters to stimulate ingestive behaviors. To do so we used our simulated natural housing system that allows hamsters to forage for and hoard food. Animals were given an injection of GO-CoA-Tat (i.p., 11 μmol/kg) every 6. h because that is the duration of its effective inhibition of octanoylated ghrelin concentrations during a 48. h food deprivation. We found that GO-CoA-Tat attenuated food foraging (0-1. h), food intake (0-1 and 2-4. h), and food hoarding (0-1. h and 2 and 3. days) post-refeeding compared with saline treated animals. This suggests that increased octanoylated ghrelin concentrations play a role in the food deprivation-induced increases in ingestive behavior. Therefore, ghrelin is a critical aspect of the multi-faceted mechanisms that stimulate ingestive behaviors, and might be a critical point for a successful clinical intervention scheme in humans.

AB - Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone produced by the stomach in direct proportion to the time since the last meal and has therefore been called a 'hunger signal'. The octanoylation of ghrelin is critical for its orexigenic functions and is dependent upon ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) catalyzation. The GOAT inhibitor, GO-CoA-Tat, decreases the circulating concentrations of octanoylated ghrelin and attenuates weight gain on a high fat diet in mice. Unlike rats and mice, Siberian hamsters and humans do not increase food intake after food deprivation, but increase food hoarding after food deprivation. In Siberian hamsters, exogenous ghrelin increases ingestive behaviors similarly to 48-56. h food deprivation. Therefore, we tested the necessity of increased ghrelin in food-deprived Siberian hamsters to stimulate ingestive behaviors. To do so we used our simulated natural housing system that allows hamsters to forage for and hoard food. Animals were given an injection of GO-CoA-Tat (i.p., 11 μmol/kg) every 6. h because that is the duration of its effective inhibition of octanoylated ghrelin concentrations during a 48. h food deprivation. We found that GO-CoA-Tat attenuated food foraging (0-1. h), food intake (0-1 and 2-4. h), and food hoarding (0-1. h and 2 and 3. days) post-refeeding compared with saline treated animals. This suggests that increased octanoylated ghrelin concentrations play a role in the food deprivation-induced increases in ingestive behavior. Therefore, ghrelin is a critical aspect of the multi-faceted mechanisms that stimulate ingestive behaviors, and might be a critical point for a successful clinical intervention scheme in humans.

KW - Body mass

KW - Food intake

KW - Foraging

KW - Hoarding

KW - Siberian hamster

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84876468785&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84876468785&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.yhbeh.2013.02.001

DO - 10.1016/j.yhbeh.2013.02.001

M3 - Article

VL - 63

SP - 667

EP - 673

JO - Hormones and Behavior

JF - Hormones and Behavior

SN - 0018-506X

IS - 4

ER -